List of Fellows

 Metin Akay, '12, University of Houston, USA
 Joji Ando, '09, Dokkyo Medical University, Japan
 Lars Arendt-Nielsen, '03, Aalborg University, Denmark
 Kazuhiko Atsumi, FF, FE, University of Tokyo, Japan
 Albert Avolio, '12, Macquarie University, Australia
 Jing Bai, '12, Tsinghua University, China
 James Bassingthwaighte, '09, University of Washington, USA
 Rebecca Bergman, '12, Medtronic, USA
 Marcello Bracale, '03, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
 Per-Ingvar Branemark, '00, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
 Colin Caro, '00, Imperial College London, UK
 Ewart Carson, '06, City University London, UK
 Sergio Cerutti, '03, Polytechnic University in Milan (Politecnico), Italy
 Walter H. Chang, '06, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan
 Shu Chien, '00, University of California San Diego, USA
 Jean-Louis Coatrieux, '02, University of Rennes 1, France
 Richard S. C. Cobbold, FF, University of Toronto, Canada
 Paolo Dario, '03, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies of Pisa, Italy
 Ivan Daskalov, '03 (Deceased), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
 David Delpy, '03, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), UK
 Jacques Demongeot, '12, University Joseph Fourier, France
 Andr谷 Dittmar, '12, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France
 Takeyoshi Dohi, '06, University of Tokyo, Japan
 Olaf Doessel, '12, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
 Floyd Dunn, FF, FE, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 Shmuel Einav, '05, Tel Aviv University, Israel
 David Elad, '13, Tel Aviv University, Israel
 Ross Ethier, '09, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
 Uwe Faust, FF, FE, University of Stuttgart, Germany
 Leszek Filipczynski, FF, FE (Deceased), Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 Yuan-Cheng B. Fung, FF, FE, University of California San Diego, USA
 Leslie Alexander Geddes, FF (Deceased), University of Toronto, Canada
 Amit Gefen, '14, Tel Aviv University, Israel
 Morteza Gharib, '12, California Institute of Technology, USA
 Bin He, '12, University of Minnesota, USA
 Hiie Hinrikus, '03, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia
 Nozomu Hoshimiya, '06, Tohoku Gakuin University, Japan
 Peter Hunter, '03, University of Auckland, New Zealand
 Helmut Hutten, '03, Graz University of Technology, Austria
 Dov Jaron, '06, Drexel University, USA
 Fumihiko Kajiya, '00, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Japan
 Akira Kamiya, '02, Nihon University, Japan
 Roger D. Kamm, '06, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
 Hiroshi Kanai, FF, FE, Sophia University, Japan
 Zhenhuang Kang, FF, Chengdu University of Science and Technology, China
 Toivo Katila, '03, Helsinki University central Hospital, Finland
 Richard E. Kerber, '09, University of Iowa, USA
 Makoto Kikuchi, '12, National Defence Medical College, Japan
 Yongmin Kim, '09, Pohang University of Science and Technology, South Korea
 Richard Kitney, '03, Imperial College London, UK
 Peter Kneppo, '03, Czech Technical University, Czech Republic
 Pablo Laguna, '12, University of Zaragoza, Spain
 Daniel Laurent, FF, FE, Universite Marne-La-Vallee, France
 Raphael Lee, '12, University of Chicago, USA
 Peter Lewin, '12, Drexel University, USA
 Pai-Chi Li, '09, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
 Zhi-Pei Liang, '12, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 Kang-Ping Lin, '13, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Taiwan
 John H. Linehan, '06, Northwestern University, USA
 De-Pei Liu, '13, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, China
 Jaakko Malmivuo, '03, Tampere University of Technology, Finland
 Roman Maniewski, '03, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 Andrew McCulloch, '05, University of California San Diego, USA
 Jean-Pierre Morucci, FE, National Institute of Health and Medical Research, France
 Joachim Nagel, '12, University of Stuttgart, Germany
 Maciej Nalecz, FF, FE (Deceased), Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 Robert M. Nerem, FF, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
 Shuming Nie, '13, Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
 Peter Niederer, '00, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
 Benno M. Nigg, '00, University of Calgary, Canada
 Marc Nyssen, '12, Free University Brussels, Belgium
 P. Ake Oberg, FF, Linkoping University, Sweden
 Kazuo Ogino, '12, Nihon Kohden Corporation, Japan
 Nicolas Pallikarakis, '05, University of Patras, Greece
 Xiaochuan Pan, '13, University of Chicago, USA
 John P Paul, FF, FE (Deceased), University of Strathclyde, UK
 Antonio Pedotti, '00, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
 Robert Plonsey, FF, FE, Duke University, USA
 Leandre Pourcelot, '00, Francois Rabelais University, France
 Jose Principe, '12, University of Florida, USA
 Basil Proimos, FE, University of Patras, Greece
 Buddy D. Ratner, '00, University of Washington, USA
 Gunter Rau, FF, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
 Robert S Reneman, '03, Maastricht University, Netherlands
 James B. Reswick, FF, FE, U.S. Department of Education, USA
 Nandor Richter, FF, FE, National Institute for Hospital and Medical Engineering, Hungary
 Laura Roa,'03, University of Seville, Spain
 Fernand A Roberge, FF, University of Montreal, Canada
 Colin Roberts, '02, King's College London, UK
 Peter Rolfe, FF, Oxford BioHorizons Ltd., UK, and Harbin Institute of Technology, China
 Annelise Rosenfalck, FF (Deceased), Aalborg University, Denmark
 Christian Roux, '03, T谷l谷com Bretagne, France
 Masao Saito, FF, Tokyo Denki University, Japan
 Niilo Saranummi, '00, VTT Technical Research Center, Finland
 Shunske Sato, '03, Osaka University, Japan
 Klaus Schindhelm, 'FF, University of New South Wales, Australia
 Geert W. Schmid-Schoenbe, '05, University of California San Diego, USA
 Leif Sornmo, '12, Lund University, Sweden
 Jos AE Spaan, '09, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
 Fong-Chin Su, '13, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
 Kazuo Tanishita, '09, Keio University
 Nitish Thakor, '12, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA
 Jie Tian, '12, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
 Tatsuo Togawa, FF, Waseda University, Japan
 Shoogo Ueno, '06, University of Tokyo, Japan
 Max E. Valentinuzzi, FF, FE, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
 Christopher L. &Kit* Vaughan, '05, University of Cape Town, South Africa
 Karin Wardell, '12, Linkoping University, Sweden
 Bruce C. Wheeler, '14, University of Florida, USA
 Peter Wells, FF, FE, Cardiff University, UK
 Andrzej Werynski, '03, Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Poland
 Nico Westerhof, FE, VU University, Netherlands
 Erich Wintermantel, '03, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland
 Jan Wojcicki, '12, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 Bernhard Wolf, '12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
 Guang-Zhong Yang, '13, Imperial College London, UK
 Zi Bin Yang, '02, Peking Union Medical College, China
 Yuan-Ting Zhang, '06, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
 
 

FF stands for Founding Fellows
FE stands for Fellow Emeritus
'00 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2000
'02 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2002
'03 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2003
'05 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2005
'06 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2006
'09 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2009
'12 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2012
'13 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2013
'14 stands for Fellow inducted in the year 2014

 

 

Biography of Fellows

     
 Metin Akay
 

Metin Akay received his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey in 1981 and 1984, respectively and a Ph.D. degree from Rutgers University in 1990. He is currently the founding chair of the new Biomedical Engineering Department and the John S. Dunn professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Houston.

He has played a key role in promoting biomedical education in the world by writing and editing several books, editing several special issues of prestigious journals, including the Proc of IEEE, and giving several keynote and plenary talks at international conferences, symposiums and workshops regarding emerging technologies in biomedical and healthcare engineering.

He is the founding editor-in-chief of the Biomedical Engineering Book Series published by the Wiley and IEEE Press and the Wiley Encyclopedia of Biomedical Engineering. He is also the editor of the Neural Engineering Handbook published by Wiley/IEEE Press and the first steering committee chair of the IEEE Trans on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.

He established the Annual International Summer School on Biocomplexity from Gene to System sponsored by the NSF and the IEEE EMBS and is the founding chair of the IEEE EMBS Special Topic Conference on Neural Engineering. He is also the founder director of the US-Turkey Advanced Institute on Healthcare, sponsored by the NSF and endorsed by the NAE.

He is also the chair of the IEEE EMBS Neuroengineering Technical Committee. He was the program chair of the 2001 Annual International Conference of IEEE EMBS and the co-chair of the 2006 Annual International Conference of IEEE EMBS.

He currently serves on the advisory board of several international journals including the IEEE T-BME, IEEE T-ITIB, Smart Engineering Systems etc. and furthermore serves on several NIH and NSF review panels.

Dr. Akay is a recipient of the IEEE EMBS Early Career and IEEE EMBS Service awards, the first Information Technology Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB) Leadership award as well an IEEE Third Millenium Medal and is a fellow of IEEE, the Institute of Physics (IOP), the American Institute of Medical Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). His Neural Engineering and Informatics Lab is interested in developing an intelligent wearable system for monitoring motor functions in Post-Stroke Hemiplegic Patients and detecting coronary artery disease. In addition, his lab is currently investigating the effect of nicotine on the dynamics of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neural networks.


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 Joji Ando
 

Joji Ando was born in Hokkaido, Japan, in 1948. He received his M.D. in 1973 and earned Ph.D in Internal Medicine in 1981 from Hokkaido University. He was a medical staff in the Department of Internal Medicine from 1973-1975 and in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine from 1975 to 1983 in Hokkaido University Hospital. From 1983 to 1991, he worked for the Institute of Electronic Science in Hokkaido University as an assistant professor. From 1987 to 1988, he studied abroad as a research fellow in Dr. E. Levine*s laboratory, The Wistar Institute, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. In 1991, he moved to the Department of Cardiovascular Biomechanics as visiting associate professor in the University of Tokyo. From 1997 to 1999, he was an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, and from 1999 to 2009, he was the professor of the same department. He is currently a professor at Dokkyo Medical University*s Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering.

His research has focused on the role of hemodynamic forces such as shear stress generated by blood flow in the regulation of vascular functions and in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis. He has been studying the molecular mechanism by which vascular endothelial cells lining the inner surface of blood vessels sense shear stress and transduce blood flow information into their functional responses. His recent studies showed that endothelial cells release ATP in response to shear stress, which results in a Ca2+ influx and increased Ca2+-induced signal transduction. Moreover, he identified specific ion channels (P2X4 purinoceptors) responsible for shear-stress-induced Ca2+ influx, and his P2X4-deficient mice revealed that the shear-stress-sensing mechanism plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of cardiovascular functions in vivo, such as in the control of blood pressure, blood flow-induced vasodilation, and blood flow-mediated vascular remodeling. As a result of these important findings, his data was published in Nature Medicine (2006).

He has been contributing to both education and development of biomedical engineering through lectures and his work with students, and by serving as the vice president of the Japanese Society of Medical and Biological Engineering as well as being the Editor in Chief of its official journal. He is or was a trustee of several professional societies, including Japanese Society for Medical and Biological Engineering, Japanese Society of Biorheology, Japanese College of Angiology, and Japanese Society for Microcirculation.


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 Lars Arendt-Nielsen
 

Lars Arendt-Nielsen is professor at Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark. He is director and co-founder of Center for Sensory-Motor Interactiton, Aalborg University. He received a Ph.D in biomedical engineering sciences at Aalborg University in 1987 on a thesis related to assessment and analysis of brain potentials elicited with high intensity lasers. In 1994 he received a doctor of medical science degree from Aarhus University on a thesis based on pain related electrophysiological signals from the human brain and how these signals were modulated by pharmacological interventions.

In 1993 he was appointed professor and co-founded Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI) which is a basic research center focusing on translational research in neuroscience and bioengineering with the aim to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic methods in the areas of pain, motor control, sports sciences, and rehabilitation (www.hst.smi.aau.dk). SMI is an international research and training center with 50% of the staff coming from abroad and a total of 85 researchers and 70 PhD students employed. The Center publishes 100+ papers in peer-reviewed journals/year. In 2009 he co-founded C4Pain (www.C4Pain.com) as a clinical trial unit utilizing advanced technological solutions for screening potency of new drugs candidates in the area of pain management. He is head of R&D for this research based company. In 2011 he founded Eir (Empowering Industry and Research) a science and business park in the area of health sciences and technology (www.eirbusinesspark.com) for which he is the director. The aim of EIR is research based innovation.

He has been member of the Danish Technical Research Council and the Danish Council for Research Education. In addition he has been advisor for several EU framework programs. He has been guest professor, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okasaki, Japan and is honorary professor at Jiaotong University, Medical School, Xi*an, China and University of Bern, Medical School, Switzerland. He was part-time guest professor at Linkoping Universitet, Sweden from 2010-12.

He has published more than 700 papers in peer reviewed international journals in the area of basic and applied bioengineering in the fields of pain assessment, motor control and drug profiling. He is a fellow of International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering, is fellow of the Danish Academy of Technological Sciences, and has been knighted by the Danish Queen.


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 Kazuhiko Atsumi
 

Dr. Atsumi is a cardiac surgeon, biomedical engineer, a member of the Science Council of Japan, and a Professor Emeritus of Tokyo University. In 1959, he started artificial heart research, and, in 1985, he recorded a survival of 344 days for a goat with a total artificial heart. He has also researched laser surgery, biomagnetism, and medical thermology. Since 1990s, he has promoted the concept of integrative medicine, which calls for the integration of modern western medicine, traditional medicine, and complementary medicine.

He was born in Osaka, Japan, in 1928 graduated from Tokyo University, Medical School in 1954 and trained on Cardio vascular Surgery in Tokyo University Hospital. He started R & D on Laser Surgery in 1965 and organized Japanese Society of Laser Surgery & Medicine in 1970. He was appointed as a Professor of Tokyo University and opened Institute of Medical Electronics* in 1967. He organized the Conference of International Society of Laser S & M and appointed as the President of ISLSM in 1981. He was appointed as a Member of Science Council in 1991 and as a Chairman of Medical Section in the Council in 1994. He organized the International Federation on Laser S & M and appointed as the President of IFLSM in 2005.


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 Albert Avolio
 

Dr. Avolio, BE, PhD (UNSW) is Professor of Biomedical Engineering in The Australian School of Advanced Medicine at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. He has acquired international recognition in the field of cardiovascular haemodynamics and has over 140 publications including a book, book chapters and peer reviewed articles as well as over 250 conference presentations. He has extensive experience in PhD supervision and in examination of local and international PhD theses. He has taught in the fields of cardiovascular dynamics and in the broad area of engineering in medicine and biology. His research areas include arterial haemodynamics, cardiovascular modelling, arterial mechanics, vascular endothelial function, cardiovascular control, blood pressure measurement and biological signal processing. He has received over $6.7 million in collaborative research grant support and is on the assessment panel of national and international granting bodies. He is on the editorial board of journals of cardiovascular research and hypertension and is a reviewer for over 35 international scientific journals.


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 Jing Bai
 

Jing Bai is Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. She received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, in 1983 and 1985, respectively. From 1985 to 1987, she was a Research Associate and Assistant Professor at the Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute, Drexel University. In 1988, 1991, and 2000, she became an Associate Professor, Professor, and Cheung Kong Chair Professor at Biomedical Engineering Department of Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. Her research areas included mathematical modeling and simulation of cardiovascular system, optimization of cardiac assist devices, medical ultrasound, telemedicine, home health care network and home monitoring devices, and infrared imaging. Her current research interest is medical imaging. She has authored or coauthored ten books, more than 300 journal papers and obtained 56 patents. She was an Associate Editor for Annals of Biomedical Engineering (2009-11), and is an Associate Editor for IEEE Transaction on Information Technology in Biomedicine (1997- ). She is Fellow of Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), and International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE).


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 James B. Bassingthwaighte
 

James B. Bassingthwaighte is a Professor of Bioengineering and Radiology at the University of Washington. He is an active teacher and researcher focused on bioengineering and quantitative and integrative approaches to cardiovascular physiology. He trained in Physiology and Biochemistry (University of Toronto, B.A. 1951), Medicine (University of Toronto, M.D. 1955), and studied at the Postgraduate Medical School of London (Hammersmith Hospital) and at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where he completed a residency in Medicine and Cardiology and a Ph.D. in Physiology (1964). At the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine from 1964 to 1975 he became Professor of Medicine and Physiology. From 1975 to 1979, he chaired the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. In 1979 he established the National Simulation Resource Facility for Circulatory Mass Transport and Exchange at the University of Washington, a center for research and development of methods of modeling analysis of the circulation, and the kinetics of solute blood-tissue exchange in metabolic systems. Particular contributions are in the interpretation of PET and NMR images and in multiple indicator dilution studies. His scientific goals have emphasized integrative approaches.

In 1997 he formally initiated the Physiome Project, a large-scale, international effort to organize and integrate physiological knowledge from genome to integrated function. This effort required the development of web-based and networked biological databases (www.physiome.org). Current research focuses on the development of modelling tools for physiological and pharmacological systems. A particular goal is the development and archiving of Reproducible Research Packages, open source distributable models verified internally and containing the experimental data used for evaluation of the model for validity. The archived model packages are now represented by JSim Project files running on any platform, the goal is to generalize the concept to include any modeling system. This work contributes to the Multiscale Modeling consortium of the Interagency Modelling and Analysis Group, IMAG, of the federal research agencies in the USA and to the Virtual Physiological Human, VPH, program in Europe.

He has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications and two books, served as President of the Biomedical Engineering Society and the Microcirculatory Society, chaired the Cardiovascular Section of the American Physiological Society, and was the Editor-in-chief of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering. He has served on the publications boards of the Biophysical Society, the American Physiological Society, Biomedical Engineering Society and Microcirculatory Society. He is a Fellow of AIMBE (American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering) and of the IAMBE (International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering) and has been the recipient of honors from BMES, American Physiological Society, Maastricht University (The Netherlands), The Netherlands Biophysical Society, Cardiovascular Systems Dynamics Society, Microcirculatory Society, and McGill University. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering.


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 Rebecca Bergman
 

Ms. Bergman has more than 24 years of experience in the medical technology industry including over 17 years of experience in research and technology management and product development at Medtronic, Inc., a leading manufacturer of products and therapies used in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of chronic medical conditions. She currently serves as Vice President, Research & Technology for Medtronic*s Cardiac Rhythm Disease Management (CRDM) business. She previously served as Vice President, CRDM New Therapies & Diagnostics as well as Vice President, Corporate Science and Technology, where she directed innovative technology, product development, and information management initiatives. She has received several of Medtronic*s highest honors, including membership in the Bakken Society, an honorary society for Medtronic*s most distinguished scientific and technical contributors, and recipient of the Wallin Leadership Award, which recognizes outstanding leadership at Medtronic. Ms. Bergman is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Since 2008, she has served as a member of the Board of Directors of Sigma-Aldrich. In addition, she currently is a member of the Board of Directors of The Bakken Museum, the Board of Trustees for Gustavus Adolphus College and a number of academic advisory boards. She previously served on the National Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) of the NIH and the St. Catherine University Board of Trustees. Ms. Bergman holds a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University, completed graduate studies in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, and received an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree from Drexel University.


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 Marcello Bracale
 

Marcello Bracale was born in Naples, Italy in 1939. He received his degree in Electronical Engineering from the University of Naples in 1965 and his post-graduate specialization in Biomedical Technologies from the University of Bologna.

Since 1976 he was full professor in Applied Electronics and from 1980 up to the present, he has been full professor in Biomedical Engineering, directing the BME Unit at the Electronic Engineering Dept. of the Univ. "Federico II" of Naples. At present he is also professor in "Automation and Organization of Health Care System". He also teaches Biomedical courses in the Post-graduate Schools of the Faculties of Medicine and Surgery at the Universities of Naples. He directs in Naples the "Research Unit in Medical and Rehabilitation Engineering" of Italian National Research Council. He was nominated Professor Honoris Causa at the Technical University of Cluj Napoca (Romania) Faculty of Electronic Engineering.

He was Vice-President of the "Societa' Generale di Informatica" (SO.GE.I.). From 1990 to 1993 he was Regional President of the "Associazione Italiana Ospedalita' Privata" (AIOP) in Naples. He is a professional consultant of "Clinica Villalba", a private hospital; and of "Technical Data Control", a software house for Informatics Health Care Systems in Naples. He is scientific consultant of FINSIEL for the European Committee and for International and National activities in Telematics Health Care System. He is a member of the International and Italian Electrotechnical Commission-Technical Committee n.62: Electrical Equipment in Medical Practice, Sub-Committee 62D: Electromedical Equipment. He was appointed member of administration council of the CNETO (Centro Nazionale per l'Edilizia e la Tecnica Ospedaliera).

His main fields of scientific and professional interest are: electronical and biological instrumentation; biosignal and data analysis; health care system and management; health telematics and telemedicine. At present he is author and co-author of 350 publications.


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 Per-Ingvar Branemark
 

Per-Ingvar Branemark studied at Lund University in Sweden. In 1969 he became professor of Anatomy at Gothenburg University. It was there that his major work on osseointegration took place, having been based on studies of bone and marrow tissue vascular systems, together with the evaluation of the surgical technique's effect on bone tissue's ability to regenerate and remodel in relation to preparation trauma and functional load.

Branemark discovered that pure titanium did not induce any severe inflammatory or other reaction in skin or bone tissues a factor important for external prosthesis connection such as for craniofacial rehabilitation. Crucially he found that skeletal anchorage of a prosthesis requires that relative movements between the implant and anchoring tissue should be avoided. In addition, the anchoring bone has to be loaded in such a way that it remodels adequately to provide a stable anchorage platform.

Branemark has many awards and prizes for his work. He won the coveted Swedish Society of Medicine's Soederberg Prize in 1992 - often referred to as the 'mini-Nobel' - and the Swedish Engineering Academy's equally prestigious medal for technical innovation.

Outside Sweden, he has been honored with Harvard School of Dental Medicine Medal for his dental implant work in the US and holds more than 30 honorary positions throughout Europe and North America, including Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Society of Medicine in the UK.


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 Colin G Caro
 

Colin Caro, a physiologist and medical doctor, is Emeritus Professor of Physiological Mechanics and Senior Research Investigator in the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial College London. In 1966, he founded the Physiological Flow Studies Unit, which, with other groups, and the support of various bodies, including the Bagrit Foundation, pioneered bioengineering at Imperial College and had global impact. Among his contributions, Professor Caro was the first to propose and demonstrate that, contrary to the longstanding prevailing view, atherosclerosis in adults develops preferentially in stagnation, or low wall shear, regions in arteries. The initial publications have been cited over a thousand times and given rise to probably several times that number of papers on wall shear and vascular biology and pathology. Professor Caro also later drew attention to the three-dimensionality (non-planarity) of arterial geometry and resulting effects on blood flow, including inhibition of separation and instability and promotion of cross-mixing and blood-wall mass transport. This understanding is finding application in relation to circulatory disease, and arterial bypass and vascular access grafts and endovascular stents. It is also finding application in industrial flows. Professor Caro has held office in international biomechanics societies and advised on vascular disease at governmental level. He has been the recipient of several awards/fellowships and honorary doctorates.


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 Ewart Carson
 

Ewart Carson is Emeritus Professor of Systems Science in the Centre for Health Informatics at City University London. Born in Liverpool in 1943, he was educated at Liverpool College and the University of St Andrews where he obtained a BSc in Electrical Engineering. A Chartered Engineer by profession, he worked for Philips before moving to City University London. There he became Professor of Systems Science, headed the Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine (now the Centre for Health Informatics) from 1983-2003 and was Director of the Institute of Health Sciences. From 1990-1998 he was Visiting Professor in Medical Informatics at the United Medical and Dental School of Guy*s and St. Thomas* Hospitals, University of London. He holds PhD (Systems Science) and DSc (Measurement & Information in Medicine) degrees from City University. Professional qualifications include Fellowships of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (UK) and the IEEE.

He has worked for 40 years with medical colleagues in the UK, across the rest of Europe and beyond in applying maths, IT and engineering in a range of medical and healthcare settings. Particular areas of research expertise include: the development of modelling methodology for application in physiology, medicine and healthcare and its management,with particular emphasis on the adoption of a systems approach; clinical decision support; and telecare. In the educational context, he co-founded the first MSc programme in Medical Informatics in Europe in 1991 which has been successfully offered by City University over a 20 year period.

International professional positions have included: Chairman, IFAC Co-ordinating Committee on Bio- and Ecological Systems, Chairman IFAC TC on Biomedical Modelling and Control, Member of the IFAC Technical Board, and Chairman IMEKO TC on Measurement in Medicine and Biology. Other professional activities include acting as an assessor/reviewer for the European Commission and for national research councils in Australia, Denmark and Italy. Currently he is an Associate Editor of Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine.

Honours include Honorary Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (London), IEEE EMBS Career Achievement Award, Distinguished Service Awards from IFAC and IMEKO and Fellowship of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He has published 13 authored and edited books and over 300 papers.


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 Sergio Cerutti
 

Sergio Cerutti has always operated in the area of Biomedical Engineering. In 1982 he became Associate Professor in this topic at the Politecnico, Milano and in 1990 Professor at the University of Rome ※La Sapienza§ and then back to the Politecnico, Milano, from 1994. In 2000-2006: Chairman of the Department of Bioengineering of the Politecnico; in 1995-1998: Chairman of Undergraduate Program in Biomedical Engineering and in the period 1998-2000 Vice-Chairman of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering in the same Politecnico; actually (from 2010) he is the Chairman of the Programs in Biomedical Engineering.

He has had a strong background in both signal processing techniques and system and control theory and his most important contribution has been to develop research activity and didactical courses in which the modeling aspects of biological systems had a deep interaction with advanced signal processing techniques. In particular, he studied the control mechanisms of cardiovascular system from the variability signals in heart rate, blood pressure and respiration, by using open- and closed-loop identification algorithms and parametric methods of spectral estimation. Besides important physiological findings, such an approach has brought fundamental contributions in the diagnosis of important pathologies like hypertension, myocardial infarction, diabetic neuropathy, in monitoring the critically ill patient, in dialysis treatment etc, as it is demonstrated by various cooperative researches carried out by his group with Italian and foreign medical institutions. More recently, he has applied the same approach of data and signal processing and modeling towards the fulfilling of the so-called 4M-integration paradigm: i.e. integrating biosignals in a Multivariate, Multiorgan, Multimodal and Multiscale approach, in order to have a better comprehension of the complex pathophysiological involvement, through an olistic vision. He spent more than one year at Harvard School of Public Health, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, USA and at MIT Health Science and Technology Department, Boston, USA in two periods in the &80*s. He was also Visiting Professor for a period of four months at IST University - Department of Physics, Lisbon, Portugal in 2008-2009.

He has been Elected Member of IEEE-EMBS AdCom (Region 8) in the period 1993-1996. He is actually Fellow Member of IEEE and of EAMBES and Associate Editor of IEEE Trans BME. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the IEEE-EMBS Summer School on Biomedical Signal Processing: he was the local organiser of four Summer Schools held in Siena. He is the Author of more than 500 international scientific contributions (more than 250 on indexed scientific journals). His h-index is around 42, with a total citations of about 15,500. His most-cited paper is the Task Force on HRV, 1996, the 3rd most cited paper on Circulation [more than 4000 citations].

In his more than 35-year long career at University he has mentored a few hundreds of PhD students, graduate and undergraduate students in Electrical Engineering and especially in Biomedical Engineering: many of them are actually working inside the research environment (Full Professors, Associate Professors and Assistant Professors as well as Research Fellows and post-docs) in Italy as well as worldwide. Others have followed a career inside companies (mainly of electromedical equipments and devices) as well as in the clinical engineering activity or the free-lance profession.


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 Walter H. Chang
 

Dr. Walter H. Chang is currently the professor/director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering/Center for Nano Bioengineering at Chung Yuan Christian University (CYCU), Taiwan. Dr. Chang received his B.S. in Physics at CYCU in 1966, his M.S. in Electrical Engineering at Yonsei University, Korea in 1974, and his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Tokyo Denki University, Japan in 2002. Dr. Chang has also been a full-time professor in Department of Biomedical Engineering at CYCU since 1981. He was also a visiting professor of the Bioengineering Center at the University of Washington, USA in the summer of 1990 as well as a visiting professor at the Human Performance Laboratory in the University of Calgary, Canada in the summer of 1999.

From 1975 to 2002, Dr. Chang served various administrative positions, such as the Department Chairman, the Dean of General Affairs, Director of Library, Director of Alumni and Placement Affairs, and the Dean of Research & Development at CYCU. He is now the Director of the Center for Nano Bioengineering, CYCU. Dr. Chang is a member of several professional societies, such as ACS, SPIE, Biomedical Engineering Society of Taiwan, Bioelectromagetic Society, and etc. He was a member of the World Council for Biomechanics and the President of Biomedical Engineering Society of Taiwan. Dr. Chang has made great efforts to promote the Biomedical Engineering Society of Taiwan and has been honored as a member of IFMBE. He served on the IFMBE*s Administrative Council and involved in their Asian Pacific Working Group. He was elected as a Administrative Council Member of IFMBE from 1997 to 2003.

Dr. Chang*s areas of interest in reserach are Nano Biotechnology, Cellular and Molecular Imaging, Biomechanics, Medical Ultrasound, Biomedical Optics, and Bone Tissue Engineering. He is the PI of the following research projects : (1) Mechanism Investigation on Novel Characteristic of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters for Biomedical Applications (2011-2014), (2) Novel Nanobone Tissue Engineering and Monitoring (2010-2013), (3) Platform of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters Probing Techniques in Biomedical Applications (2008-2010), and (4) Novel Nano-bubble Development for Ultrasound Contrast Agent (2009-2010). Dr. Chang is the author of over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. He has organized and served on the programs and technical committees of various domestic and international conferences. Dr. Chang has also been the President of Goldred Nanobiotech Co., Ltd. since 2011 (http://www.goldrednanobiotech.com.tw).


[top]                        

     
 Shu Chien
 

Shu Chien received his medical degree from National Taiwan University and Ph.D. (Physiology) from Columbia University. He was a faculty at Columbia University (Physiology) till 1988, when he came to University of California, San Diego (UCSD), where he is University Professor and Y.C. Fung Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine and Director of the Institute of Engineering in Medicine (IEM). The IEM has the mission of applying engineering concept and technology to enhance medical research and the delivery of healthcare. Dr. Chien is also Director of the UC System-wide Bioengineering Institute of California that synergizes the bioengineering activities among the ten UC campuses, including annual symposia.

Dr. Chien has made seminal contributions to advancing the integrative approach of research at the interface of biology, medicine and engineering. His primary areas of research are cardiovascular regulation, molecular and cellular bioengineering, endothelial cell mechanotransduction, and regulation of stem cell fate by the microenvironment. He is the author of over 500 peer-reviewed scientific articles and the editor of eleven books.

Dr. Chien has been Presidents of the American Physiological Society, Microcirculatory Society, International Society of Biorheology, and Biomedical Engineering Society, as well as the Federation of Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB) and American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He was Chair, Co-Chair or Honorary Chair of the First World Congress of Biomechanics (1990), Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting (1997), International Congress of Physiological Sciences (2005), International Congress of Biorheology (2005), 7th Congress of Federation of Asian & Oceanian Physiological Societies (2011), and IEEE EMBS Meeting (2012).

Dr Chien is an Honorary Member of four professional societies, including being the only living honorary member of the Chinese Association of Physiological Sciences and IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. He is a Fellow of IAMBE, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Society, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has been bestowed Honorary Doctoral Degrees by Columbia University and five universities in China Mainland and Taiwan, and is an Honorary Professor at nine universities.

Dr. Chien has received numerous awards and honors, including the Melville Medal (twice), Landis Award, ALZA Award, Zweifach Award, Galletti Award, Poiseuille Medal, and the Founders Award of the National Academy of Engineering. He was selected as Asian American Engineer of the Year (2005), LEE Kwan Yew Distinguished Visitor (2008), and recipient of Taiwan*s National Health Medal (1998), and Presidential Science Prize (2009). He is a Laureate of U.S. National Medal of Science, receiving the medal from President Obama in October 2011.

Dr. Chien is one of eight scientists who are Members of all three U.S. National Academies (National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine), as well as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a Member of Academia Sinica in Taiwan and a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing.


[top]                        

     
 Jean-Louis Coatrieux
 

Jean-Louis Coatrieux, graduated in Electrical Engineering at the Polytechnic Institute, Grenoble, France in 1970 and he received the PhD and State Doctorate in Sciences in 1973 and 1983, respectively, from the University of Rennes 1, Rennes, France. He was Assistant Professor from 1970 to 1975 and Associate Professor from 1976 to 1986 at the Institute of Technology of Rennes. Since 1986, he has been Director of Research at the National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), France, and since 1993 has been Professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA. He was also Professor at Telecom Bretagne, Brest, France. He has been the Head of the ※Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et de l'Image§, INSERM, up to 2003 and in charge of the National Research Program in Health Technology at the Ministry of Research (1998-2001), France. He was President of the International Scientific Committee of IBEC (2008-2013), Spain, and member of the CIBER-BBN Advisory Board, Spain. He serves as expert near the European Commission and is regularly solicited by research institutes and agencies over the world (USA, Canada, Sweden, Australia,..)

His experience is related to 3D images, signal processing, pattern recognition, computational modeling and complex systems with applications in integrative biomedicine. He founded the IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging. He published more than 300 papers in journals and conferences and edited many books in these areas. He has served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering (1996-2000) and in Boards of several major journals: Proceedings of IEEE, Critical Review on Biomedical Engineering, Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, Medical Image Analysis, etc. He has received several awards from IEEE (among which the EMBS Service Award, 1999, the Third Millennium Award, 2000, EMBS Career Achievement Award, 2006). He is Doctor Honoris Causa from the SouthEast University of Nanjing, China, and Foreign Excellence Professor (2011-2015). He is the recipient of the Brittany Regional Council Medal (2006), the Claude Fourcade Award (2011) and the Jiangsu Award (China, 2013). He is currently Emeritus Research Director of INSERM.


[top]                        

     
 Richard S. C. Cobbold
 

Richard S. C. Cobbold received the B.Sc. degree in physics from Imperial College, University of London, in 1956 and obtained the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1961 and 1965, respectively. Since 1966 he has been with the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering where he was director from 1974 to 1983. He is currently Professor Emeritus in the institute and in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests and those of his laboratory center around fundamental problems of ultrasound, real-time ultrasound imaging simulation, and imaging within bone. He is the author of three books, a number of research papers, and several book chapters. His most recent book, Foundations of Biomedical Ultrasound, was published by Oxford University Press in 2006. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1976 and was appointed Canada-UK Rutherford lecturer in 1995.


[top]                        

     
 Paolo Dario
 

Paolo Dario is Professor of Biomedical Robotics and Director of The BioRobotics Institute of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (SSSA), Pisa, Italy. He coordinates the PhD Program in BioRobotics at SSSA. His main research interests are in the fields of bio-robotics, medical robotics, bio-mechatronics and micro/nano biomedical engineering. He is the coordinator of many national and European projects and the author of more than 500 scientific papers.

He has been and is Editor-in-Chief, Associate Editor and member of the Editorial Board of many international journals, and the program chair and plenary invited speaker in many international conferences. Prof. Dario has served as President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society in the years 2002-2003, he is an IEEE Fellow, a Fellow of the European Society on Medical and Biological Engineering, and a recipient of many honors and awards, such as the Joseph Engelberger Award for Pioneer Research in Biomedical Robotics.


[top]                        

     
 Ivan Daskalov
 

Prof. Ivan Konstantinov Daskalov (February 26, 1933- June 12, 2004) was a prominent Bulgarian scientist in the field of biomedical engineering. He was director of the former Centre of Biomedical Engineering from 1994 to 2004, which was later renamed after him to Centre of Biomedical Engineering ※Prof. Ivan Daskalov§.

Ivan Daskalov graduated from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1957. His Ph.D. thesis was on complex stimulation for physiological research and his D.Sc. work was on screening analysis of physiological signals. He was professor of biomedical engineering at the Medical Faculty since 1976 and Director of the Institute of Medical Engineering. He joined the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1963 and headed the Center of Biomedical Engineering. He has published numerous studies on ECG analysis, electrical stimulation, and instrumentation for physiological research. He teaches various biomedical engineering topics in the Medical Faculty, the Technical University, and several foreign universities.


[top]                        

     
 Dave Delpy
 

Dave Delpy is currently Chief Executive Officer of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in the UK.

He graduated from Brunel University in 1970 with a degree in Applied Physics, following which he spent a two year period in industry at Darchem Ltd in Darlington, UK. He subsequently joined the Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department at University College Hospital, London on an MRC studentship. Between 1976 and 1986 he worked as a Medical Physicist in University College Hospital. In 1986 he was appointed a Senior Lecturer in the department (now part of University College London (UCL)) and in 1991 became Hamamatsu Professor of Medical Photonics and the Head of Department. In September 1999 he was appointed a Vice Provost of UCL, responsible for the faculties of Engineering Sciences, the Built Environment and Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and in 2004, Vice Provost for Research. He joined the EPSRC in 2007. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, Royal Academy of Engineering, Academy of Medical Sciences, Institute of Physics, Institute of Physics & Engineering in Medicine and the Royal Society of Arts.

His research is in the broad area of physiological monitoring, with a particular interest in the monitoring of preterm infants. Over the years he has worked on catheter tip blood pressure sensors, catheter tip oxygen, carbon dioxide and pH sensors; and transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors using electrochemical, mass spectrometric and gas chromatographic techniques. He subsequently worked on the early application of 31P NMR Spectroscopy for the study of brain metabolism in neonates and in 1983, the group he collaborated with reported the first in vivo human 31P brain spectra, measured in preterm infants. The group subsequently described for the first time the phenomena of delayed metabolic brain damage following an hypoxic/ischaemic insult, and later reported the significant reduction in damage that can result from brain cooling.

His group is probably best known for its developments of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and imaging (NIRI) techniques for the study of tissue oxygenation and metabolism. Following Frans Jobsis*s 1977 report of NIRS in the cat brain, the group developed a NIRS system capable of measuring changes in haemoglobin oxygenation and cytochrome oxidase redox state in the neonatal brain. This instrument formed the basis of the NIRO1000, marketed by Hamamatsu Photonics. Subsequent collaborations with Hamamatsu led to a series of commercial NIRS systems (the NIRO 500, 300, 200 and 100). The group first described the ※time of flight§ method for quantifying optical pathlength in tissues, enabling absolute quantitation of concentration changes, and subsequent techniques involving physiological manoeuvres which enabled absolute quantitation of tissue blood volume and flow. The NIRI work led to the development of a 32 channel ※time of flight§ system for imaging both the neonatal brain and the breast. Over this period the group also led the development of diffusion based models of light transport in tissue and the inverse problem of image reconstruction from NIR data. A detailed description can be found at: http://www.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/research/borl/.


[top]                        

     
 Jacques Demongeot
 

Jacques Demongeot is Dr in Science, Dr in Medicine and Professor at the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, France. His research covers medical informatics, robotics and theoretical modeling of living systems. He has created the most important French research laboratory, TIMC-IMAG, with about 300 people. His impressive scientific coverage allows him closely working on most of the topics addressed in this research unit. He was nominated as Member of IUF (Institut Universitaire de France) for 10 years (1995-2005), a highly selective national Institute. He has had also major responsibilities at the Ministry of Research for Health Technology programs (1998-2000), at the CNRS (National Centre for Scientific research) and he chaired the national program on complex systems for Life Sciences. In Grenoble, he served as Director of the Doctoral School ※Engineering for Life Sciences§ over 1994-2002. He has been invited professor in several US universities like USC, UCLA and the University of Washington. He has been President of the European Society for Mathematical & Theoretical Biology (ESMTB) (1997-2000). Among the editorial boards where he served, there are Biomedical Modelling, Measurement and Control, J. of Theoretical Medicine, BMC Bio-informatics, Computational & Mathematical Methods in Medicine. He headed many national and European projects (like ISCAMI, Integrated System for Computer Aided Medical Interventions, and MDMO (Matching of Deformable Medical Objects). Jacques Demongeot received major distinctions: the Arch of Europe Gold Star Award 92, the French national Innovation award (2000), the EC e-Health Award 2003 (2nd Prize 每 e-Health for professionals, jury CE DG XIII). His publications (more than 160 in journals and 13 books) include among others Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci, BMC Bioinformatics, Proc. IEEE, European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, IEEE Trans. Neural Networks, Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., IEEE Trans Information Tech. Biomed, Math. Biosciences, IEEE Trans. Systems Man Cyber., etc. He holds 6 patents, all transferrced to industry. Eight companies were created based on research activities of TIMC.


[top]                        

     
 Andr谷 Dittmar
 

Andr谷 Dittmar is a CNRS Research Engineer. He has pionneered microtechnologies for medicine in the 70*s in France and he actively defended this field over 35 years. He headed a research group at the §Institut National des Sciences Appliqu谷es§ in Lyon where he impulsed applied research with the objectives to design, realize and test microdevices and microsystems always responding to clinical and patient needs. His research has been driven by innovations (he holds ten patents on sensors and actuators) and many of his project results were transferred to industry. His collaborative research has been very often made with medium and large size companies (Loreal, Danone,..) through major national and European contracts. More recently, he has been motivated by bio-inspired technologies. In addition to serve in many IEEE Conference Committees, he organized important events like IEEE Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology Symposia (the first one being organized in Lyon, 2000) and the IEEE EMBC (Lyon 2007). He was the President of the French BME Society (SFGBM) in 2009-2010 (now its past-President up to 2012). He has been always concerned by keeping alive the french BME journal (IRBM) where he published most of his research papers. He received the Cristal Award from the CNRS in 2003 for his career achievements, an award specifically given to research engineers.


[top]                        

     
 Takeyoshi Dohi
 

Takeyoshi Dohi received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in precision machinery engineering from The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1972, 1974, and 1977, respectively.

He was a Research Fellow with the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo. In 1979, he joined Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo, as a Lecturer and then became Associate Professor in 1981. From 1981 to 1988, he was an Associate Professor of precision machinery engineering at The University of Tokyo, where he has been a Full Professor since 1988, and is currently a Professor of information science and technology. His research interests include computer-aided surgery, rehabilitation robotics, artificial organs, and true 3-D image display.

Dr. Dohi was the President of the International Society for Computer-Aided Surgery, the President of The Japan Society of Computer-Aided Surgery, the President of The Society of Life Support Engineering, and the President of The Japanese Society for Medical and Biological Engineering. He became a Fellow of the Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention Society in September 2009.


[top]                        

     
 Olaf Doessel
 

Olaf Doessel is Professor and head of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Karlsruhe, now Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). He was born in Luebeck, Germany, studied Physics at the University of Kiel and made his PhD in 1982. Then he worked at the Philips Research Laboratory Hamburg where he did research on sensors for low-cost and industrial applications. In 1985 he became head of the research department ※Measuring Techniques§. He managed research and development of a multichannel SQUID magnetometer for medical diagnostics. In 1996 he became full Professor at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). His main interests are bioelectric signals and fields in human body, computer modeling of the heart, elastomechanics of the heart, the inverse problem of Electrocardiography, ECG biosignal processing, the impedance of tissue, numerical field calculation in the human body and new methods of medical imaging.

Olaf Doessel is member of the IEEE and of the German Association of Biomedical Engineering (DGBMT) where he is member of the board and where he served as president from 2004 to 2006. He is member of the advisory board "Medical Technology" of the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). In 2003 he was awarded the Ragnar Granit Prize of the Ragnar Granit Foundation, Helsinki, Finland. In 2006 he was awarded to become member of the Academy of Science of Berlin-Brandenburg (BBAW) and of the German Academy of Technical Sciences "acatech" where he is co-speaker of the theme "Health Technologies". He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal ※Biomedical Engineering / Biomedizinische Technik" (Walter de Gruyter) and member of the editorial board of the journal "Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing" (Springer). In 2007 Olaf Doessel became member of the advisory board of the "Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt" (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute, and of the management board of the VDE, the German Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies.

Olaf Doessel published more than 400 scientific articles (http://www.researcherid.com/rid/D-3203-2011) and a book on "Medical Imaging". He is coauthor of the survey "Medical Engineering in Germany" initiated by the German Ministry of Education and Research BMBF (published in 2005). Together with Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schlegel he was chairman of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering 2009 in Munich, which attracted 3400 scientists from all over the world.


[top]                        

     
 Floyd Dunn
 

Floyd Dunn received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1956. He is a professor emeritus, having retired in 1995, in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and in the Bioengineering and Biophysics Programs at UIUC and a full-time Beckman Institute faculty member in the Bioacoustics Research Laboratory. His fields of professional interest are ultrasound biophysics and bioengineering.

Honors and awards: Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member, National Academy of Engineering; Fellow and Past President, Acoustical Society of America; Fellow, AAAS; Fellow, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine; Fellow, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; Fellow, Institute of Acoustics, U.K.; Fellow, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; Honorary member, Japan Society for Ultrasound in Medicine; American Cancer Society, Eleanor Roosevelt International Fellow; NIH Research Fellow; Fogarty International Fellow; Fulbright-Hays Senior Fellow; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellow; Wm. J. Fry Memorial Award, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine; Silver Medal, Acoustical Society of America; Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine; Medal of Special Merit, Acoustical Society of Japan; and University Scholar, UIUC; and IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Career Achievement Award.

Floyd Dunn's work continues the approximately forty years of study in the field of bioultrasonics. Specifically, these studies deal with determination of the ultrasound propagation properties of living systems, viz., sound speed, absorption, attenuation, impedance, as functions of temperature, pressure, media composition; investigation of the physical mechanisms involved in producing reversible and irreversible changes in living systems by ultrasound, viz., thermal, cavitation, mechanical; toxicological aspects of ultrasound exposure; ultrasound metrology; and ultrasound microscopy. A portion of Dunn's work is peripherally related to molecular nanostructures, one of the main research themes of the Beckman Institute.


[top]                        

     
 Shmuel Einav
 

Prof. Einav, Incumbent of the Herbert Berman Chair for Vascular Bioengineering of Tel Aviv University, is a world-distinguished expert in the cardiovascular circulatory system and the field of biomedical engineering. He is currently also a University Research Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and the Co-Director of their Center of Excellence. He is best known for his studies on blood flow through heart valves, coronary circulation, blood-tissue interaction, and flow and turbulent characteristics in occluded arteries. The focus of his research is the role of hemodynamics in the initiation of atherosclerosis, the dynamics of cardiovascular flows, and the influence of flow and the associated shear stress on vascular endothelial biology. In recognition of his significant achievements and important contributions to science, biomedicine and technology, he has been elected as a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering, European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering & Science, Biomedical Engineering Society and a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Prof. Einav is also a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Caltech 每 California Institute of Technology.

During his tenure at Tel Aviv University, under his supervision, the Department of Biomedical Engineering was established, a Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering was successfully implemented, and in 2001 the first class of Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering students began its studies. He designed and supervised the construction of a new building for Multidisciplinary Research in Biomedical Engineering and Materials that was recently completed and houses all of the BME activities. He is the Founding Director of the Slezak Super Center for Cardiac Research and Biomedical Engineering, the Founding Director of the Kodecz Center for Medical Engineering and Physical Sciences, and the Founding Director of the California Friends Laboratory for Biomedical Computing and Parallel Processing.

Prof. Einav has published more than 120 scientific articles, reviews and invited chapters, and a multitude of abstracts in the biomedical engineering, fluid mechanics and medical fields. He is a member of the editorial board of three leading journals. He is the Principal Investigator in a number of research projects and grants, awarded from Israel, Europe and United States sources, including NIH, NSF and NASA. Prof. Einav is the past President of the Israeli Society for Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 David Elad
 

David Elad is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tel Aviv University since 1985. He received his B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering on 1973, M.Sc. and D.Sc. in Biomedical Engineering on 1978 and 1982, all from the Technion, Haifa, Israel. He was then awarded the Rothschild and Bantrell post-doctoral fellowships at Imperial College London and M.I.T.

David pioneered computational studies of biofluid transport phenomena in the nasal cavity in the late 80's. In the early 90's he established a comprehensive research program in bioengineering of human reproduction, both at Tel Aviv University. He developed his expertise in the fields of Respiratory Biomechanics and Reproductive Bioengineering, from complete organs all the way to the cellular levels. The respiratory studies included integrative assessment of respiratory muscles, transport phenomena in the human nose, objective noninvasive evaluation of nasal function and mechano-transduction of nasal epithelial cells cultured under air-liquid interface conditions, including effects of air-pollution. The reproductive studies included the role of uterine peristalsis in early human life, pre-implantation embryo transport after IVF, feto-maternal blood circulations in the placenta, transport of nutrition, pharmaceuticals and carcinogenic materials across a tissue engineered placental barrier, mechano-transduction of cultured ovarian cancer cells and biomechanics of infant breastfeeding.

Dr. Elad published 115 publications in peer-review journals and was the leading editor of 4 special journal issues in reproductive bioengineering, respiratory biomechanics and biofluid mechanics. He has played a leading role in the worldwide evolvement and promotion of Reproductive Bioengineering. In 2005 he organized the first session of Reproductive Bioengineering in the BMES annual meeting in Baltimore, and the mini-symposium in the 12th International conference on BME in Singapore. These initial efforts lead later to tracks of sessions in the 5th and 6th World Congress of Biomechanics in Munich and Singapore, respectively, and an independent conference in Austria in 2008. He was also appointed as an associate editor for the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering in order to handle articles in reproductive engineering.

David has been a visiting scholar at Imperial College London, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Drexel University, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Toronto, City College New York and Columbia University. He is a member of the World Council for Biomechanics (2002-14) and a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (2004) and the Biomedical Engineering Society, USA (2005).

David is also an active member of the BME community in Israel. He served for 10 years as the academic secretary of the Israel Society for medical and Biological Engineering (2007-10). In 2000 he developed the program for undergraduate studies in BME at Tel Aviv University.


[top]                        

     
 Ross Ethier
 

Professor C Ross Ethier PhD received a B.Sc. (Eng.) in Mathematics & Engineering from Queen*s University, Kingston, Canada in 1980, winning the Queen*s University Medal. He was then awarded an NSERC Science *67 scholarship to complete a M.Math degree at the University of Waterloo, Canada, following which he completed S.M. and Ph.D. degrees at M.I.T. in 1983 and 1986, respectively. He was appointed an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Toronto in 1986, Full Professor in 1997 and Director of the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at U. of Toronto in July 2005, while holding a cross-appointment to Ophthalmology at U of Toronto. From 1 August 2007 to 31 July 2012 he was Professor of Biomechanics and Head of the Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London. He was also the Director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial. From 1 August 2012 he is the Lawrence L. Gellerstedt, Jr. Chair in Bioengineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University School of Medicine.

He was awarded a von Humboldt Fellowship as visiting professor at the University of Erlangen-Nuremburg in 1999/2000. In 1997-99 he was an NSERC Steacie Fellow; at the time of this award, only four such awards were given per year across all areas of engineering, mathematics and science in Canada. Until leaving the U of Toronto, he held a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Computational Technology (www.chairs.gc.ca; 2001-2007). His work has resulted in 125 refereed journal publications. He serves on the editorial board of three publications (including the two leading basic science ophthalmology journals, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science and Experimental Eye Research), on the World Council of Biomechanics and on the National Glaucoma Research Scientific Review Committee of the American Health Assistance Foundation. He is co-author, with Craig A. Simmons, of a recent textbook on biomechanics. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institute for Biological and Medical Engineering, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering and the City and Guilds London Institute.

Professor Ethier*s field is biomechanics, with specific interests in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, in the mechanobiology of osteoarthritis and in atherogenesis. His work has been supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the National Institutes of Health, the Glaucoma Research Society, Physicians Service Incorporated, the Alcon Research Institute, Bausch and Lomb Corporation, The Wellcome Trust and EPSRC. In the area of glaucoma, his main research contributions have been in understanding the mechanisms of pressure regulation in the eye and in the biomechanics of the optic nerve head in glaucoma.


[top]                        

     
 Leszek Filipczynski
 

Professor Leszek Filipczynski (1923-2004), full Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, was a prominent Polish scientist in the field of acoustic, pioneer in the application of ultrasonic methods in biology and medicine.

Prof. Filipczynski received M.Sc. degree in radio-technical engineering from the Warsaw University of Technology in 1949 and the Ph.D. degree in engineering science in 1955. He was appointed associate professor in 1957, full professor in 1962, corresponding member of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS) in 1969, and full member of PAS in 1976. Since 1952 he was with the Institute of Fundamental Technological Research PAS, being the deputy director for scientific problems (1965-69), the general director of the institute (1969-74) as well as the chairman of the Scientific Council of the institute (1989-93).

He was the chairman of the Polish Committee for Acoustics PAS, founder and member of the Polish Acoustical Society, and chairman of the Scientific Council of the Institute for Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS (1982-2004). Since 1993, he was also a member of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Prof. Filipczynski was the author or co-author of 12 monographs and above 170 original publications in scientific journals and conference proceedings, as well as 62 patents. He promoted 14 doctors who became continuators of his scientific activity in Poland. His works concerned basic problems in the field of ultrasonic, especially: ultrasonic transducers, propagation of ultrasonic waves, material fatigue testing, ultrasonic defectoscopy, thermal effects generated by ultrasonic beams. He was pioneer in the ultrasound application in biology and medicine. His works were focused on ultrasonography of human organs such as brain, abdomen, eye, heart, on application of ultrasonic Doppler methods for blood flow measurements, as well as development of metrology of shock waves for lithotripsy and lately non-linear propagation of ultrasonic waves in soft tissues.

Prof. Filipczynski was awarded by several Polish state distinctions, among them the Commander Cross of the ※Polonia Restituta§. He was recognized by the world-wide scientific authorities as pioneer in ultrasound application, he was granted by the American Institute for Ultrasonic in Medicine in Washington with Diploma of Pioneer of Ultrasonics in Medicine. In 1975-79 he was the vice-chairman of the European Federation for Ultrasonic in Medicine.


[top]                        

     
 Yuan-Cheng B. Fung
 

Professor Fung is widely recognized as the father of biomechanics, having established the fundamentals of biomechanical properties in many of the human body's organs and tissues. He also studies remodeling, growth and resorption of tissues as a foundation of tissue engineering. Currently, his focus is on growth and remodeling of blood vessels under stress in health and disease. He is inventing new techniques and developing new experiments to determine the zero-stress state and the constitutive equations of blood vessel components such as collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle; lumped layers such as the endothelium, the media, and the adventitia; and the vessel as a whole. He is developing theory to integrate morphology, mechanical properties, rheology, thermal environment, and boundary conditions into a pressure-flow relationship.

Y.C. Fung joined UCSD in 1966 to initiate a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. program in bioengineering. Fung is the recipient of the President's National Medal of Science, the Founder's Award from the National Academy of Engineering, and numerous other prestigious honors and prizes. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, National Institute of Medicine, and National Academy of Sciences. He has written many authoritative books on biomechanics that are used as textbooks around the world, in addition to books on solid mechanics and continuum mechanics. Prior to joining UCSD, Fung was a faculty member in the Department of Aeronautics at the California Institute of Technology, where he received his Ph.D. in 1948.


[top]                        

     
 Leslie Alexander Geddes
 

Geddes was born May 24, 1921 in Scotland, and moved with his family to Quebec, Canada at a young age. He held the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and the Ph.D. degree in Physiology from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. At that medical school, he was Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor of Physiology, and Director of the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Director of Engineering at Purdue University.

Geddes was a member of the American Physiological Society, and was a Fellow of the IEEE; the American Association for the Advancement of Science; the American College of Cardiology; Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine; and the Royal Society of Medicine.

He received the award for leadership in biomedical engineering from the Alliance for Engineering in Medicine and Biology (1985); was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (1985); the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Career Achievement Award (1986); the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation Laufman-Greatbatch Award(1987); the Outstanding Educator Award of the American Society for Engineering Education (1989); the IEEE Edison Medal in 1994 for fundamental contributions to applied biomedical instrumentation and the understanding of the electrical properties of the cardiovascular system, and the 2006 National Medal of Technology by President George W. Bush for his contributions to electrode design and tissue restoration.[2] He was awarded a D.Sc. honoris causa by McGill University in 1971.


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 Amit Gefen
 

Prof. Amit Gefen received the B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering and M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Tel Aviv University in 1994, 1997, and 2001, respectively. During 2002-2003 he was a post-doc at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. He is currently a Full Professor with the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering of Tel Aviv University. His research interests are in studying normal and pathological effects of biomechanical factors on the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs, with emphasis on applications in prevention of acute and chronic injuries. In 2007-2008 he was a visiting scientist in Eindhoven University of Technology, where he developed tissue-engineered model systems to study pressure ulcers. To date, Prof. Gefen published more than 150 articles in peer-reviewed international journals, many of which are on chronic wounds and their prevention, and he has also edited several relevant books. He is now editing a book series on Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials published by Springer, and is Associate Editor and serving on Editorial Boards of several international journals, PLOS ONE, the Annals of Biomedical Engineering, the Journal of Biomechanics, Clinical Biomechanics, Medical Engineering & Physics, Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, the Journal of Tissue Viability and the Journal of Wound Care, to mention a few. Prof. Gefen is currently the President of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP, www.epuap.org) and a member of the World Council of Biomechanics. The research of Prof. Gefen is funded by the Israel Science Foundation, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Science, Ministry of Defense, and national and international industries.


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 Morteza Gharib
 

Dr. Gharib*s is a world renowned authority in the area of cardiac mechanics and bioinspired biomedical devices. Through his unique experimental approaches, he has shown that major aspects of cardiac function are reflected uniquely and sensitively in the optimization of vortex formation in the blood flow during each diastole. He is currently focused on the fundamental understanding of embryonic heart development, and the role of pulsatile flows in the process of valvogenesis and pumping. His work has illuminated the role of pulsating flow in the morphogenesis and function of the embryonic heart and has formed the basis for designing new biomedical devices for glaucoma and also for hydrocephalus.

Dr. Gharib has founded the department of bioengineering at Caltech and served as its founding chair for 4 years. In 2007, he established the Charyk center for bioinspired design at Caltech that currently is home to more than 15 diverse interdisciplinary projects. In his position he has promoted the field of bioinspired design and engineering and its application for the design of biomedical devices throughout the world. Also, he has consistently promoted acceptance of international students, and post-doctoral fellows to Caltech*s Bioengineering program.

His reconstruction of an aortic valve model based on a suggestion by Leonardo Da Vinci was displayed in Victoria and Albert Museum in London for 6 months in 2006 and has been featured in a BBC documentary about Leonardo*s inventions.

Dr. Gharib has pioneered the technique of particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and its ultrasound version for medical applications. This technique is now a method of choice for biological flow measurements in many research groups in the US and overseas.

Dr. Gharib awards and recognitions include: Fellow, American association for the advancement of science (AAAS), Fellow, American Physical Society (APS), Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME), Distinguished Israel Pollak Lectureship Award, 2005, Sackler Scholar in Bioengineering, University of Tel Aviv, Award for Excellence, Visualized Image (Artistic Section), 1995, Visualization Society of Japan, Award for Excellence, Visualized Image (Technical Section), 1995, Visualization Society of Japan, Flow Visualization Award, American Physical Society, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1993,1994, 2000, 2004. He has received 5 new technology recognition awards from NASA in the fields of advanced laser imaging and nanotechnology. Dr. Gharib is the principal inventor of more than 45 patents of flow and biomedical devices for his 3-D imaging camera system, he has received R&D Magazine*s ※R&D 100 innovation award§ for one of the best invention of 2008.


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 Bin He
 

Bin He is an internationally renowned authority on functional source imaging and neuroengineering. He is Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair for Engineering in Medicine, and director of Institute for Engineering in Medicine at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering with highest honors from Zhejiang University, China, Ph.D. degree in bioelectric engineering with the highest honors from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. He conducted postdoctoral fellowship in biomedical engineering at Harvard 每 M.I.T. Division of Health Sciences and Technology. After working as Research Scientist at M.I.T., he joined the faculty of the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1994 till 2004. From January 2004, he came to University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where he is Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and founding director of Center for Neuroengineering, and director of the Institute for Engineering in Medicine (IEM) of the University of Minnesota, a campus-wide institute to promote interdisciplinary collaboration between biomedicine and engineering.

Dr. He has made seminal research contributions to the fields of functional imaging and neuroengineering. His research interests include brain source imaging, multimodal functional neuroimaging, brain-computer interface, and cardiac electrophysiological tomography. Dr. He has published over 180 peer-reviewed scientific articles in leading international journals, edited four books, and delivered over 200 keynote, plenary, symposium, and invited talks in a number of international conferences and institutions worldwide. He is the sole editor of ※Neural Engineering§ (2005; 2nd ed, 2013).

Dr. He is a Fellow of International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering, IEEE, the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the Institute of Physics (U.K.), and the International Society for Functional Source Imaging. He is an Honorary Professor or Visiting Professor at multiple universities, including Shanghai Jiaotong University, Zhejiang University, Peking Union Medical College, and Tianjin University. Recognizing his accomplishments, Dr. He has been awarded the Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association, the CAREER Award from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the University Scholar Award from the University of Illinois while he was on faculty, the Distinguished McKnight University Professorship and Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair from the University of Minnesota, and Outstanding Research Award from the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. His research has been featured in various media including ABC News, Fox News, Washington Post, Scientific American, Economist, and by U.S. National Science Foundation on its SEE INNOVATION website.

Dr. He has served as Presidents of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), International Society for Functional Source Imaging, and International Society for Bioelectromagnetism. He has served as Conference Chair of the 31st Annual International Conference of IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (2009), Co-Chair of Scientific Committee of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (2012), Conference Chair of IEEE Life Sciences Grand Challenges Conference (2012), and Conference Chair of IEEE EMBS International Conference on Neural Engineering (2013). Dr. He is on the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, on the Steering Committee of IEEE Life Sciences Initiative, and on the Governing Council of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, and on the editorial boards of eight other journals.


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 Hiie Hinrikus
 

Hiie Hinrikus is Professor Emeritus at Tallinn University of Technology (TUT). She is born on Tallinn, Estonia. She received her first degree in Physics from M. V. Lomonossov Moscow State University in 1960, PhD in Radio Physics from the National Institute of Physical and Radio technical Measurements of USSR (VNIIFTRI) in 1967 and DSc from the Institute of Radio and Electronic Engineering (IRE) of the USSR Academy of Sciences in1989.

After working as engineer at a radio-technical enterprise and as research scientist at VNIIFTRI, she joined the Tallinn University of Technology in 1968. She got the positions of Docent and later Professor of Radio and Laser Engineering, head of the Chair. She initiated the organization of the Centre of Biomedical Engineering at TUT in 1994 and served as its Founder Chair for 8 years.

Her research activity has been related to Radio Physics, microwave and laser engineering and application of microwave and optical technology in medicine, including microwave radiometry, biological effect of electromagnetic radiation and biosignals interpretation. She honoured National Science Award in Engineering in 2000.

Prof. Hinrikus is Founder Member and was first President of the Estonian Society for Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics 1994-2002. She has served in several functions in different organizations and societies. She was President of the 11th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering in 1999 and served as a member of committees of many conferences on Biomedical Engineering. She was elected as Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.


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 Nozomu Hoshimiya
 

Nozomu Hoshimiya was born in Japan, 1941. He received the Ph.D. degree in electronic engineering from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1969. From 1972 to May 1982, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University. From June 1982 to April 1988, he was a Professor in the Research Institute of Applied Electricity, Hokkaido University. Starting in May 1988, he was a Professor in Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University (Chair of Biomedical Electronics). He was a Vice-President of Tohoku University in 2001每2002. He was the President of Tohoku Gakuin University from 2004 to 2013. He is a chancellor of Tohoku Gakuin University.

His principal fields of interest are the following biomedical engineering fields: functional electrical stimulation (FES) as a neural prosthesis, especially its application to rehabilitation fields; self-organizing neural networks, especially on the recognition and generation of the spatio-temporal patterns; and physiological instrumentation. Dr. Hoshimiya was an Ad-Com Member of the IEEE/EMBS in 1989每1990, and was a founding Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, in 1993每1996. He was also an Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Japan Society of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, 1991每1995. He has been an AIMBE Fellow since 2002. He was a Vice-President of the Japan Society of Medical and Biological Engineering in 1998每1999. He was a Member of the Board of Directors of the International Society of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) in 1999每2000, and has also been the President of Japan FES Society since 2004每2005.


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 Peter J. Hunter
 

Prof Hunter completed an engineering degree in 1971 in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (now Engineering Science) at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, a Master of Engineering degree in 1972 (Auckland) on solving the equations of arterial blood flow and a DPhil (PhD) in Physiology at the University of Oxford in 1975 on finite element modeling of ventricular mechanics. His major research interests since then have been modelling many aspects of the human body using specially developed computational algorithms and an anatomically and biophysically based approach which incorporates detailed anatomical and microstructural measurements and material properties into the continuum models. The interrelated electrical, mechanical and biochemical functions of the heart, for example, have been modelled in the first &physiome* model of an organ. As the recent co-Chair of the Physiome Committee of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) he has been helping to lead the international Physiome Project which aims to develop model and data encoding standards (CellML, FieldML, BioSignalML) and to use computational methods for understanding the integrated physiological function of the body in terms of the structure and function of tissues, cells and proteins. He is currently a Professor of Engineering Science and Director of the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland, co-Director of Computational Physiology at Oxford University and holds honorary or visiting Professorships at a number of Universities around the world. He is on the scientific advisory boards of a number of Research Institutes in Europe, the US and the Asia-Pacific region. He is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society (London and NZ), the World Council for Biomechanics and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently President of the Physiological Society of New Zealand, Secretary-General of the World Council for Biomechanics and Acting Vice-President of IUPS. Recent awards are the Rutherford medal, the KEA (Kiwi Expats Abroad) &World Class NZ* Award in Research, Science, Technology & Academia category, and the 2012 EMBS Academic Career Achievement Award.


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 Helmut Hutten
 

Helmut Hutten was born in Germany in 1936. He received his ※Dipl. Ing.§ degree from the now Technical University in Karlsruhe in 1961, and his ※Dr.-Ing.§ degree from the now Technical University Darmstadt in 1969. Between 1961 and 1964 he was working in a company before leaving to the Institute of Physiology at the University in Mainz. He completed his Habilitation with the venia legendi in ※Biomedical Engineering and Biophysics§ in 1972 and became a professor in the Medical Faculty of the University of Mainz. 1991 he was nominated the chair professor for Biomedical Engineering at the University of Technology in Graz and retired in 2004 as professor emeritus. At present he is still active as external examiner for foreign universities and as consultant for companies.

He has served in many functions in different organizations. He was member of the AC of the German Society for Biomedical Engineering for more than 10 years, president from 1991 until 1993, and past-president from 1993 until 1995. From 1994 until 2000 he was member of the AC of IFMBE and chairing the Working Group for European Activities. In recognition of his merits he was elected as fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering. From 2000 until 2003 he was member of the AC of IUPESM and chairing the Regional Development Committee. As consultant he was active in more than 100 projects for different governmental and non-governmental research funding organizations. From 1975 until 1996 he was Editor-in-Chief of the journal Medical Progress through Technology and reviewer for many national and international journals. He was organizer of different national and international conferences, primarily the 1st and 2nd European Medical and Biological Engineering Conference EMBEC in Vienna in 1999 and 2002, respectively. 2005 he was Honorary President of the EMBEC*05 in Prague. Since 1999 he is president of the non-profit organization EMBEC. He was member of the EAMBES Protem group and the first treasurer of EAMBES after its launching. He was the preliminary chair of the EAMBES fellows division. He was member in the German DKE standardizing committee for medical equipment for more than 10 years and head of the Notified Body 0636 until 2004. He and his students have received different awards. He was distinguished by a honorary doctor and by lifelong honorary membership in different organizations.

He has published more than 100 articles in reviewed journals and 21 books or book chapters. He is author or co-author of more than 280 published presentations in proceedings and of more than 220 other publications. He is author or editor of several books. His scientific topics are medical electronics and instrumentation, pacemaker technology, blood flow measurement and microcirculation, analysis of physiological systems, computer-assisted modelling and computer-assisted therapy management with special regard to diabetes mellitus, dialysis and cardiomyopathy, biotelemetry and telemedicine, and health care technology assessment. He has more than 10 patents primarily in the field of cardiac pacemakers.


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 Dov Jaron
 

Dov Jaron is Calhoun Distinguished Professor of Engineering in Medicine, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, and Professor of Electrical Engineering, Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1967. From 1967 to 1971 he was Senior Research Associate and later Director of Surgical Research at Maimonides Medical Center in New York. From 1971 to 1973 he was Director of Surgical Research at Sinai Hospital of Detroit. In 1973 Dr. Jaron joined the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Rhode Island and became its Coordinator of Biomedical Engineering. He served as Director of the Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute at Drexel University from 1980 to 1996. From 1991 to 1993 he was on an assignment to NSF, where he was Director of the Division of Biological and Critical Systems, Engineering Directorate. From 1996 to 1998 he was on leave at the NIH as Associate Director, National Center for Research Resources and Director of Biomedical Technology.

Dr. Jaron led the engineering team that developed the first successful in-series cardiac assist device, the intraaortic balloon pump (IABP). Currently, the IABP is used world wide to support patients& failing circulation. His research to develop models of cardiovascular dynamics was critical to understanding the interaction of cardiac assist devices with the circulation and optimizing their effectiveness. More recently, Dr. Jaron*s research has focused on elucidating specific complex mechanisms of the microcirculation by creating models that integrate biochemical and mechanical interactions in the system at different hierarchical levels. This research is aimed at providing an insight into the pathogenesis of microvascular dysfunction diseases. Currently, it is focused on mechanisms of production and transport of Nitric Oxide in the microcirculation.

Dr. Jaron has made major contributions to the development of the biomedical engineering profession through his extensive professional activities and government service. At NSF he led in the creation of a new Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Systems. At NIH he was a major driving force within the Bioengineering Consortium (BECON). His many efforts at the agency culminated in the trans-NIH symposium titled: ※Bioengineering: Building The Future of Biology and Medicine§ which he co-chaired. The symposium was hailed by the engineering research community and by the NIH as a watershed for the agency and helped to affirm the critical role of engineering to the solution of research problems in biomedicine. It was critical to the establishment of the NIH Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

In 1986 and 1987 he served as President of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. He was President of the IFMBE from 2000 to 2003. In 2003 he became Vice President of the International Union of Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (IUPESM). Dr. Jaron was Chair of the IEEE Awards Board for three consecutive years from 2004-2007, overseeing and managing the awards program for the largest professional organization in the world. He has been Chair of the Scientific Council for the International Center of Biocybernetics, Polish Academy of Sciences since 2002. He co-directed an initiative on Science for Health and Well Being (SHWB) in which 12 Unions of ICSU (The International Council for Science) have participated. This initiative led to a new ICSU program on Systems Analysis Approach to Health and Well Being in the Urban Environment. In 2008 he was elected to the Executive Board of ICSU.

Dr. Jaron is a Fellow of the IEEE, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Academy of Surgical Research, the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, the Biomedical Engineering Society, the World Academy of Biomedical Technology, and the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering. He received the Merit Award from the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (IUPESM). In 2009 he was elected as a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Sciences.


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 Fumihiko Kajiya
 

Fumihiko Kajiya graduated from Osaka University, Medical School in 1965, and received an M.D. in 1966. His Ph.D was awarded from Electronics Engineering, Osaka University in the field of "Compartmental Analysis" in 1977 (related book published by Karger/Corona in 1984).

He served as a Research Associate jointly in the 1st Department of Medicine, Medical School and Electronics Engineering, Osaka University from 1967 to 1977. He moved to Kawasaki Medical School as a professor of Medical Engineering in 1977 and worked there for more than 20 years. He was then invited to the Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry, Okayama University as a Professor in the Department of Cardiovascular Physiology and BME in 2000. After retirement from Okayama University, he has been working in Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare since 2005. He is currently a specially appointed professor, Okayama University, and a visiting professor of Kyushu University.

As for the activity in IFMBE, Kajiya served as an AC member (1985-91), Vice President (1991-94) and President (1994-97). During the chair of the "Asia-Pacific" working group, he made efforts to found IFMBE "Asia-Pacific Conference on MBE" (initially called "Far Eastern Conference"). In 1991, he contributed to organize the Kyoto World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (president: Hiroshi Abe) as the secretary general, leading its success with more than 3000 participants. Domestically, he was President of Japanese Society for MBE (JSMBE: 1998-2000).

He has chaired a number of domestic and international conferences, such as: Japanese Biorheology Society (1982), Conference of Cardiovascular System Dynamics Society (1987), Okayama International Medical Engineering Forum (1994 & 1997), Japanese Society for MBE (1998), and Japanese Society of Microcirculation (2001). He has played important roles in other BME-related fields over the years, e.g., Co-chair: Medical Engineering Technology Industrial Strategy Consortium (2004-13), Chair: MBE Section (Basic Medicine) of Science Council of Japan (2005-11), and Expert Committee Council for Science and Technology Policy (2005-11). He was a deputy chairman of Japan Prize (selection subcommittee: Technological Integration of Medical Science and Engineering, 2009). He acted and is serving as reviewers of various grants in Japan and in other countries.

His research interests lie mainly in (1) coronary pathophysiology, (2) in vivo microvisualization and velocimetry of coronary, renal and lung microcirculation, (3) MBE approach to atherogenesis and (4) analysis of coronary and cardiac interaction by SPring-8. He has published over 180 papers (PubMed). He was an associate editor of ASME J Biomech. Engineering (2003-13), and editorial board member of Am J Physiol (heart & circulatory,﹛1999-2011) and Med. Biol. Engineering and Computing (2000-05), Heart and Vessels (1985-) etc, He received the Berz Prize Boehringer Ingelheim, 1968 & 1973, the Sanyo Press Prize, 1997, the Ogino International Prize (JSMBE), 1999, Honorary Life Member of IFMBE, 2003 and Oka-Shoten Award, 2004. He is Fellow of American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, American Heart Association, and American Physiological Society.


[top]                        

     
 Akira Kamiya
 

Akira Kamiya was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1938. He graduated Medical School, University of Tokyo in 1964 (M.D.) and then Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo in 1969 (Ph.D.). Dr. A. Kamiya had been an assistant and associate professor with Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical Dental University from 1969 to 1980. From 1976 to 1978, he spent his sabbatical with Department of Physiology in Gothenburg University in Sweden as a guest researcher. In 1980, he moved to Research Institute of Applied Electricity, Hokkaido University and served as a professor of Division of Medical Transducer for about ten years. In 1989, he moved to Institute of Medical Electronics in Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo as a professor of the division of Basic Medicine and in 1997, was shifted to Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, serving as a professor with the section of System Physiology until 1999. After retiring from University of Tokyo, he had been a professor with Research Institute for General Sciences, Nihon University, from 1999 to 2007, and a professor with Yokohama College of Pharmacology, from 2007 to 2013.

Dr. Kamiya has devoted himself for the studies on cardiovascular physiology and related molecular biology from the viewpoint of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. At first, he was interested in the functions of microcirculation, e.g., substance exchange across capillary wall. He proposed a theoretical model for transcapillary permeability of macromolecules, in a paper published in 1978 with Dr. B. Rippe and Dr. B, Folkow during his sabbatical stay in Sweden. This model was later called as ※the two pore theory§. He also had keen interest in the branching structure of blood vessels and its optimum models. With respect to the physiological mechanism inducing such an optimum structure, he and Dr. T. Togawa published a paper in 1980 titled ※Adaptive regulation of wall shear stress to flow changes in the canine carotid artery§ (Am. J. Physiology, 239, H14-H21). Since then, this paper has been cited in nearly 400 scientific papers issued from various international journals. Based on this experimental study and the finding that the adaptive response abolished after denudating the vascular endothelial cell (EC) layer just facing to blood flow, a number of international research groups involving physiologist, biologist and mechanical engineers started the in vitro studies about the effects of fluid shear stress on EC functions, by employing cultured ECs and flow loading devices as well as molecular biological techniques for the analyses of observed cellular responses. In his research group including Dr. J. Ando, Dr. K. Yamamoto and others also explored many in vitro studies in the field of cellular biomechanics from 1985 to 2013 using wild type and knockout mice, such as fluid shear stress effect on EC proliferation and migration, the sensing mechanism of the stress via the shear-specific calcium ion channel in EC membrane and so on.

In the research works on microcirculation, Dr. Kamiya and Dr. M. Shibata proposed a noble optimality model of capillary network with respect to the efficiency for oxygen transport from blood to tissue in skeletal muscles in 1990. The results of the analyses revealed a good agreement between the optimum structure and the actual arrangement during heavy physical exercise. Similar theoretical analyses concerning the oxygen transport efficiency have been further extended for the other components of the circulatory system, such as the res cell composition (hematocrit) in blood, the energetic of the cardiac ventricle, and the mechanism of ATP synthesis in mitochondria.

Regarding these studies, Dr. Kamiya published over 100 papers from international journals and a similar number of papers and review articles from Japanese journals. He received the best paper award of the year in 1972 from Japanese Society of Biomedical Engineering and Oka-Shoten Award from Japanese Society for Biorheology in 2007. He has been an honorable member of Japanese Society of Biomedical Engineering, of Japanese Society for Microcirculation and of Japanese Society for Biorheology. He has also been a Fellow, American Institute of Biomedical Engineering, since 1991.


[top]                        

     
 Roger D. Kamm
 

Roger D. Kamm is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Kamm received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern University (1972), and both his M.S. (1973) and Ph.D. (1977) in Mechanical Engineering MIT. Dr. Kamm joined the MIT faculty in 1977.

Dr. Kamm*s research aims to understand the fundamental nature of how cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli, and to employ the principles revealed by these studies to seek new treatments for vascular disease and cancer, and to develop tissue constructs for drug and toxicity screening. Current research activities in Dr. Kamm*s laboratory can be grouped into three broad categories: tissue engineering and microfluidics, cellular rheology and molecular mechanics.

Dr. Kamm has authored/co-authored over 220 refereed publications and co-edited two books. He has earned four patents and has two pending. Dr. Kamm is a Fellow of the American Institute for Biomedical Engineering, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Mechanical Engineering, the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society; and a member of the Biophysical Society, the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

He is the former chair of the U.S. National Committee on Biomechanics and the World Council on Biomechanics, and former director of the Global Enterprise for Micro Mechanics and Molecular Medicine (GEM4). He is the current chair of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Kamm is a Fellow of the Institute of Medicine, and was the 2010 recipient of the H.R. Lissner Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Hiroshi Kanai
 

Hiroshi Kanai was born in Matsumoto-city, Nagano, Japan, in 1930. He graduated from the University of Tokyo in Applied Physics, in 1953. He worked for Shimadzu and then Toshiba from 1953 to 1959. After he served as an assistant professor in the Department of Electronics Engineering, University of Tokyo, he joined Sophia University as an associate professor in 1962 and then as a professor of the faculty of Science and Engineering in 1971. After he retired from Sophia University in 2001, he served as Professor Emeritus Sophia University, and advisor to Tokyo Denki University. He also served as visiting professor or lecturer at the University of Tokyo, the Jikei University of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kyusyu University, Tokushima University and others. He contributed to the Science Council of Japan as Chairman of the Biomedical Engineering Liaison Committee. He worked for various committee members of the Japanese government. In the USA, he was a visiting associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania in 1968 and a visiting professor at the Utah State University in 1982.

He is best known for his study on bio-impedance and body fluid dynamics, and has devoted himself for studies on biomedical measurements, including electrical, light, ultrasound and thermal kinetics for more than 40 years.

He is also an active member of the Japanese Society of Medical and Biological Engineering. He served as the president of the society (1988-1989), the chairperson of the annual congress of the Society (1995), and the Chief Editor of the Transaction of the Japanese Society (1975-1976) and the Japanese delegate to IFMBE. His group received the ※best paper awards§ three times from the society.


[top]                        

     
 Zhenhuang Kang
 

Kang Zhenhuang is a well-known scholar and the academic leader of the international community and biomechanics. At his initiative, China has been rapid development of biomechanics.

In the research of heart valve in fluid mechanics Kang Zhenhuang made outstanding achievements. The creative study he led the discipline mechanism, the dynamics of cardiac valve prosthesis bileaflet mechanical heart valves and airfoil design theory in the field of natural heart valve closure, has been with the international advanced level.

Kang Zhenhuang not only in scientific research and teaching has made contributions, but also enthusiastically as many social leadership. He has served as vice president of Chengdu University of Science and Technology, vice governor of Sichuan Province, China, the first director of professional committee member of biomechanics, the world biomechanical Committee, the National People's Congress, deputy director of Sichuan Provincial People's Congress Standing Committee and the education committee director, deputy director of Sichuan Provincial leading group for science and technology, chairman of association of science and technology of Sichuan Province, chairman of the NLD Sichuan Provincial Committee Vice President, the Central Committee of the China Democratic League, member of the Academic Degrees Committee of the State Council, vice chairman of the Chinese Biomedical Engineering Society, honorary chairman of Sichuan Province Institute of biomedical engineering, mechanical society of China and Sichuan Province, director of Institute of mechanics and other staff. Also served as a "nature exploration", "books" editor in chief of the biomedical engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Toivo Katila
 

Toivo Katila received the M.Sc. and Dr.Tech. Degrees in engineering physics from Helsinki University of Technology (HUT), Espoo, Finland, in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He has been an Associate Professor of Technical Physics at HUT since 1973 and Professor since 1990. He is the Head of the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, HUT. His major interests are studies of bioelectricity and biomagnetism, biomedical signal and image processing, and spectroscopic measurements.




[top]                        

     
 Richard E. Kerber
 

Richard E. Kerber, M.D., is an academic cardiologist who has a long standing interest in general cardiology, cardiac imaging by ultrasound (echocardiography) and cardiac defibrillation and resuscitation from cardiac arrest. He has been a Professor of Medicine at the University of Iowa since 1971, and has also served as President of the American Society of Echocardiography and Chairman of the American Heart Association's Council on Cardiopulmonary and Critical Care and the AHA's Emergency Cardiac Care Program. He enjoys playing the classical clarinet, and riding his bicycles on various week long cross state bicycle rides.




[top]                        

     
 Makoto Kikuchi
 

Makoto Kikuchi was born in 1946 in Tokyo, Japan. He received his M.Sc. degree in 1971 in Electrical Engineering and his D.Sc. degree in 1974 at Keio University, Japan. Following appointments at the Institute of Medical Engineering of Tokyo Women*s Medical College, he accepted a post at the National Defense Medical College (NDMC) in 1980, at age of 33, the youngest full professor among all the national medical universities and colleges in Japan, where he served as the Professor and Chair of the Medical Engineering department (1980-), Director of the National Defense Medical College Research Institute (2003-), and Vice-President and Dean of the NDMC since 2007. Now, he is in charge of President of JAAME (Japan Association for the Advancement of Medical Equipment), and Director of MDSI (Medical Device Strategy Institute) of JAAME. Also he is Chief Director of FMDIPA (Fukushima Medical Device Indusry Promotion Agency).

He has made extensive contributions to the development of the bioengineering profession worldwide through his extensive professional activities and service with the government. He has also extensive experience in working with industry partners. He has 51 Japanese Patents and 6 USA patents in terms of theraputic devices. In recognition of his contribution and leadership, he was elected for the initiative member to start up the Strategy Planning Committee of the METIS (Medical Engineering Technology Industrial Strategy) Consortium in Japan since 2001, and has continued to hold that position up to this moment. He has been a member of Japanese Industrial Standard Committee (JISC) more than 25 years, and chaired the JIS committee for medical device and instrumentaion since more than 15 years. He also has been a member of international standardization committee (IEC, ISO) and chaired the ad-hoc committee to produce the ISO/IEC Guide 71- Guideline for standards developers to address the need of older persons and persons with disabilities. He was awarded the Ministry Medal from the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan in 1999 in recognition of many years of service and outstanding contribution for the government and industry through his activities of national and international standardization works.

Makoto Kikuchi served as an International Federation for Medical and Biological Enginering (IFMBE) Administrative Council member (1991-1997), Co-Chair and Chair of the Secretaries Committee (1988-1997), Chair of the New Initiatives Working Group (1997-2003), member of the Finance Committee (2000-2009), Nominating Committee (2000-present), Division for Health Care Technology Assessment (1991-1997), and the Working Group for Asian-Pacific Activities (1997-2009). He served as the Vice-president(2003-2006) and President(2006-2009) of IFMBE. He served also the Vice-president of the International Association for Hyperthermic Oncology (IAHO) (1996-2000), and the Chair of IEEE/EMBS in the Tokyo Section (1992-1995), and a Representative of Region 10 (1995-1996). His memberships and board positions in national academic societies included, Vice-president of the Japanese Society for Medical and Biological Engineering (JSMBE), President of the Japan Society for Hyperthermic Oncology (JSHO), and President of the Japan Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine (JSLSM).

His teaching and research activities include a broad range of biomedical engineering, bio-electromagnetics, bio-photonics and laser applications in therapeutic devices, and tissue engineering. He has published over 1200 papers, book chapters in peer-reviewed publications, and received several awards including, the Kelvin Premium of IEE in 1987, the Medical Instrument Society of Japan Award in 1998, the Magnacum Laube Citation of the American Society of Neuroradiology in 2001, and the Japanese Society of Laser Surgery and Medicine Award in 2002.


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 Yongmin Kim
 

Yongmin Kim, PhD., is President of Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH). Born in Jeju, Korea, Dr. Kim received his BS degree in Electronics Engineering from Seoul National University in 1975 and completed his MS and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Wisconsin-Madison. For 29 years from 1982 to 2011, he was Professor of Bioengineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering, and Adjunct Professor of Radiology and Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He was Professor and Chair of Bioengineering from 1999 to 2007, and the Hunter and Dorothy Simpson Endowed Chair in Bioengineering from 2004 to 2007. After 35 years in the U.S., he came back to Korea in September 2011 to serve as President of POSTECH.

Dr. Kim has devoted much of his professional career to education and research in medical imaging and computing, ultrasound systems, distributed diagnosis & home healthcare, and computer architecture. He is a passionate educator and entrepreneur with the heart of benefiting humanity with science and technology. He has made over 85 inventions that have led to over 70 patents and transferred more than 25 invented technologies to industry and helped commercialization of them.

He was a member (Chairman during 1993-1994) of Steering Committee of IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging from 1990 to 1996 and again from 2007 to 2011. He was a member of the Editorial Board of Proceedings of the IEEE, IEEE TBME, IEEE TITB, IEEE Press series, and Annual Reviews of Biomedical Engineering. He received the 2003 Ho-Am Prize in Engineering. In 2005, he received the Distinguished Achievement Award from University of Wisconsin. He received the IEEE/EMBS Early Career Achievement Award and the IEEE/EMBS Distinguished Service Award in 1988 and 2010, respectively. In 2011, he received the IEEE/EMBS William J. Morlock Award and the KOSOMBE (Korean Society for Medical and Biological Engineering) Award.

Dr. Kim is a Fellow of the IEEE, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Eta Kappa Nu.


[top]                        

     
 Richard Kitney
 

Professor Kitney is Professor of BioMedical Systems Engineering; Director of the Graduate School of Engineering and Physical Sciences; Chairman of the Institute of Systems and Synthetic Biology; and Co-Director of the EPSRC Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation. He was Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Senior Dean, all at Imperial College, London. Kitney was Founding Head of the Department of Bioengineering from 1991每2001. He is Co-founder and Chairman of Visbion Ltd. Visbion is an Imperial College spinout company. He has published over 300 papers in the fields of mathematical modeling, biomedical information systems, medical imaging, and synthetic biology.

Kitney has been a member of both British Government and European Commission Committees on the application of Information Technology to healthcare and is involved in the formulation of healthcare policy for the UK and to the EU. He wrote a major paper for the Royal Academy of Engineering (UK) on the Role of Engineering in the Post Genomic Age. Kitney is Chairman of The Royal Academy of Engineering*s UK Focus on Biomedical Engineering, as well as being a member of the Academy*s Engineering Policy Committee. Kitney was a member of The Royal Society*s working party on Digital Healthcare (Report 每 Digital healthcare: the impact of information and communication technologies on health and healthcare). He has also been a consultant to a number of major international companies.

Kitney was the Co-Chair of the joint Inquiry by The Royal Academy of Engineering and the Academy of Medical Sciences on Systems Biology. The report of the Inquiry 每 Systems Biology: a vision for engineering and medicine was published in February 2007. He also was Chair of The Royal Academy of Engineering Inquiry into Synthetic Biology 每 Synthetic Biology: scope, applications and implications was published in May 2009. He is a member of The Royal Society Working Party on Synthetic Biology.

Professor Kitney has worked extensively in the United States and has been a Visiting Professor at MIT since 1991. He is a Co-Director of the Imperial College-MIT International Consortium for Medical Information Technology. Kitney is now working extensively in Synthetic Biology and is heading Imperial College*s initiative in this area with Professor Paul Freemont (Head of the Division of Molecular Biosciences). They have been responsible for three highly successful Imperial College iGEM teams.

Professor Kitney was made a Fellow of the World Technology Network in 1999 for his innovative work in the fields of health and medicine. He was made an Academician of the International Academy of BioMedical Engineering in September 2003 (this is the highest honour bestowed by the International Federation of BioMedical Engineering Societies). He is also a Fellow of AIMBE, the America Academy of BioMedical Engineering. In 2006 he was made an Honorary Fellow of both The Royal College of Physicians and The Royal College of Surgeons.

In June 2001, Professor Kitney was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the Queen's Birthday Honors List for services to Information Technology in Healthcare.


[top]                        

     
 Peter Kneppo
 

Peter Kneppo completed his education at the Technical University of Power Engineering in Moscow receiving M.Sc. in 1964, graduated with C.Sc. degree (PhD equivalent) in Measurement Instrumentation from Institute for Measurement Theory, Bratislava in 1972 and obtained his D.Sc. in Measurement Science from Slovak Academy of Sciences (1983).

Dr. Kneppo is the director and the chief executive officer of the Slovak Institute of Metrology, Bratislava, Slovakia. Earlier, he worked for the Metra Blansko Company in the Czech Republic from 1964 to 1965, then he moved to the Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences as senior research scientist and was promoted to the scientific director (1993) he took a leading role in developing and implementing new medical devices. As Associate Professor he teaches undergraduate, graduate, and short courses on biomeasurement and modeling at the faculty of Mechanical Engineering, the Slovak Technical University, Bratislava and the Technical University, Kosice.

He received the prize of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences and the Academy of Sciences of the USSR (1979), the Czechoslovak State Prize for Science (1986) and the Prize of the Slovak Society of Biomedical Engineering in 1984, 1989, 1992 and 1994. He was selected as the corr, member of the Slovak and of the former Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences in 1987 and 1988, respectively. He is the Honorary Member of the former Czechoslovak Society of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Kneppo is the deputy chairman of the IMEKO TC-13 "Measurements in Medicine and Biology" since 1994, the co-founder and the past president of the Czechoslovak and Slovak Society of Biomedical Engineering; he has been member of the Editorial Boards of the "Czech and Slovak Journal of Biomedical Engineering".

Dr. Kneppo has published more than 200 publications dealing with measurement and modeling in medicine and biology. He was the contributing author of the book "The Theoretical Basis of Electrocardiology" (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1976), the editor of the "Measuring and Modelling of the Cardiac Electrical Field" (Bratislava, Veda, 1980), the co-editor of the "Advances in Biomedical Measurement" (New York, Plenum, 1988), the co-author of the book "Biomagnetic Measurements" (Moscow, Energoatomizdat, 1989) and the "Bioelectric and Biomagnetic Fields" (Boca raton, CRC Press, 1994). His continuing research interests are biomedical measurement and medical instrumentation, especially measurement and modelling of the both cardiac electric and magnetic fields, and medical metrology.


[top]                        

     
 Pablo Laguna
 

Dr. Laguna has created a research group starting in 1992, which is now well established at Zaragoza University. Currently it is composed of 5 senior members and up to 14 researchers at different levels from PhD Student to postdoctoral. He has contributed more than 80 peer review paper, and the group production is actually over 12 papers per year.

Dr. Laguna has co-contributed to a book for postgraduate students and early research carrier researchers: ※Biomedical Signal Processing in Cardiac & Neurological Applications,§ which has become a reference in the field of bioelectrical signal processing. He is currently leading the CIBER-BBN Institute, which is a Spanish excellence center for Biomedical Engineering, Biomaterial and Nanomedicine.


[top]                        

     
 Raphael Lee
 

Dr. Raphael Lee is the Paul and Allene Russell Professor in the Departments of Surgery, Medicine, Organismal Biology & Anatomy at the University of Chicago. He directs the University of Chicago's Laboratory for Research in Molecular Cell Repair, devoted to developing molecular regeneration therapeutics to reverse damage caused by trauma. Dr. Lee is a plastic surgeon and biomedical engineer. His professional research interests have focused on the effects of physical forces on tissue injury and healing processes, pharmaceutical control of scar formation, and in reconstructive surgery. Dr. Lee*s research group is recognized for contributions to characterizing the molecular biophysics of cell injury associated with trauma such as electrical shock, acoustic blast, ionizing irradiation and thermal burns, as well as for developing therapeutic strategies to restore cell structure and viability. In this area he has been a true pioneer. Dr. Lee's development of new therapies has resulted in the establishment of four biotechnology companies. Early in his career Dr. Lee*s lab reported two significant discoveries: (1) that cell membranes disruption was a primary mediator of tissue injury in various forms of trauma; and (II) inhibitors of cellular mechanical stress sensing in keloid scars increases scar degradation. He and his students also developed a method for applying mechanical stress and real-time non-destructive monitoring of quasistatic mechanical properties of engineered ligaments and similar tissues. At the University of Chicago he established the first multidisciplinary program for treatment of survivors of electrical shock injury, now modeled at several centers domestically and internationally. In the past decade Dr. Lee*s laboratory discovered the capability of certain classes of synthetic copolymer surfactants to restore normal structure and function to damaged cell membranes resulting in a fundamentally new class of trauma therapeutics that for first time promise to restore viability damaged tissue following severe injury such as motor vehicle accidents and military trauma. Most recently, this work has been extended to the development of synthetic chaperones to refold denatured aggregated proteins. Dr. Lee has 180 publications in peer-reviewed, archival journals and 11 patents. He was named one of ※America*s Top Surgeons§ by the Consumers* Research Council of America and earlier one of ※America*s brightest Scientists under the age of 40§, Dr. Lee has received more than 40 professional awards including being named a Schering Scholar (1978), MacArthur Prize Fellow (1981), a Searle Scholar (1985) and AAAS Fellow (2008). In 1988, the James Barrett Brown Award from the American Association of Plastic Surgeons for "advancing knowledge in the field of Plastic Surgery"; In 1997 Dr. Lee was awarded the American Electrical Power Association Award for ※Advancing Electrical Safety and Health".


[top]                        

     
 Peter Lewin
 

Peter A. Lewin, M.Sc., Ph.D. is R.B. Beard Distinguished University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering at Drexel University, Philadelphia. He is also Director of the Ultrasound Research and Education Center in The School of Bioengineering, Bioscience and Health Systems at Drexel University. Dr. Lewin obtained his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1969 and the Ph.D. in Physical Acoustics in 1979 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Before receiving his Ph.D. degree he was employed by Bruel and Kjaer, Denmark, where he was involved in the development of underwater piezoelectric transducers and associated electronics. From 1978 to 1983 he was associated with the Danish Institute of Biomedical Engineering (now Force Institutes) and The University of Denmark, Copenhagen-Lyngby, where his research activities primarily focused on propagation of ultrasound waves in inhomogeneous media and development of PVDF transducers. In 1983 he joined the faculty of Drexel University. Dr. Lewin was awarded several patents in the field of ultrasound and has authored or co-authored over 220 scientific publications, most of them on topics in ultrasound and is co-editor (with Prof. M. C. Ziskin) of a book Ultrasonic Exposimetry (CRC Press, 1993). His current interests are primarily in the field of biomedical ultrasonics including the design and testing of piezoelectric transducers and sensors, power ultrasonics, ultrasonic exposimetry, tissue characterization using nonlinear acoustics, biological effects of ultrasound, applications of shock waves in medicine and image reconstruction and processing.

Dr. Lewin is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He has also served as a Chair (1997-1999) of the AIUM's Technical Standards Committee and the AIUM's Board of Governors (2002-2004). In addition, Dr. Lewin serves as a consultant to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Dr. Lewin is also a member of several working groups within the International Electrotechnical Commission, Technical Committee on Ultrasonics. Most recently, he was elected as a member of the prestigious Franklin Institute Science and Awards Committee, Philadelphia and appointed to the 2011 IEEE Fellow Committee.


[top]                        

     
 Pai-Chi Li
 

Pai-Chi Li received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from National Taiwan University in 1987, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1990 and 1994, respectively, both in electrical engineering: systems. He joined Acuson Corporation, Mountain View, CA, as a member of the Technical Staff in June 1994. His work in Acuson was primarily in the areas of medical ultrasonic imaging system design for both cardiology and general imaging applications. In August 1997, he went back to the Department of Electrical Engineering at National Taiwan University, where he is currently Distinguished Professor of Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics. He served as Founding Director of Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics in 2006-2009 and National Taiwan University YongLin Biomedical Engineering Center in 2009-2010. His current research interests include biomedical ultrasonic imaging and signal processing.

Dr. Li is IEEE Fellow and IAMBE Fellow, Associate Editor of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control. He is also an Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, and on the Editorial Board of Ultrasonic Imaging. He received the 2011 National Innovation Award, the 2011 Distinguished Innovation Research Reward from National Taiwan University, the 2009 Distinguished Research Award from National Science Council, the 2005-2006 Distinguished Research Award from National Taiwan University, the 2005 Outstanding Electrical Engineering Professor Award from the Chinese Institute of Electrical Engineering, the 2004 Distinguished Research Award from National Science Council, the 2004 Distinguished Research Achievement Award from National Taiwan University, the 2003 Outstanding Researcher Award from National Taiwan University, the 2002 Dr. Wu Dayou Research Award from National Science Council, the 2002 Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer Award from Chinese Institute of Electrical Engineering and the 2001 Distinguished Industrial Collaboration Award from Ministry of Education. He was also the recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in Electrical Engineering: Systems in 1994 for his outstanding academic achievement at the University of Michigan.


[top]                        

     
 Zhi-Pei Liang
 

Zhi-Pei Liang received his Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1989. He subsequently joined the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) first as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (working with the late Nobel Laureate Paul Lauterbur), and then as a faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He is currently Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Co-chair of the Integrative Imaging Theme of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (http://www.beckman.uiuc.edu). He also has joint appointments in the Coordinated Science Laboratory, and the Department of Bioengineering, all at UIUC.

Dr. Liang's research interests include biomedical imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging, theory and algorithms for image formation and analysis, and their application to functional neuroimaging, cancer imaging, and cardiac imaging.

Dr. Liang is a recipient of the Sylvia Sorkin Greenfield Award (Medical Physics, 1990), an NSF Research Initiation Award (1994), an NSF CAREER Award (1995), the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) Early Career Achievement Award (1999), and the IFMBE*s Otto Schmitt award (2012). He was named Fellow of the UIUC Center for Advanced Study (1997), Henry Magnuski Scholar (1999-2001), and University Scholar (2001-2004). He was selected as a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE-EMBS (2002-2005), and received the Ronald W. Pratt Outstanding Teaching Award (2005) and the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising (2006-2008) at UIUC. Recent work from his group has received several paper awards, including the 2009 Isidor I. Rabi award from the ISMRM (International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine), IEEE-ISBI Best Paper Award (2010), and IEEE-EMBC Best Paper Award (2010, 2011). Dr. Liang has served as Conference and/or Program Chair of several major international meetings, and as Vice President (2006-2009), President-elect (2010), and President (2011-2012) of IEEE-EMBS. He is a Fellow of IEEE (2006) and ISMRM (2010), and was elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering in 2005 and to the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering in 2012.


[top]                        

     
 Kang-Ping Lin
 

Kang-Ping Lin obtained his PhD. degree in 1994 at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in Biomedical Physicis. Currently he is Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering at Chung-Yuan Christian University (CYCU), Taiwan. He is a senior regulatory consultant for applying industrial technology to medical devices and for helping biomedical industrial companies to implement the ISO-13485 and GMP in Taiwan.

His research interests include handheld medical devices, physiological signal processing, and medical image processing. His current research topics include capillary blood velocity measurement, microcirculation images, and hemodynamic data analysis.

He served as Director of Medical Device Technology Division of the Biomedical Engineering Research Center in Industrial Technology Research Institute in Taiwan (2000~2004). Over 50 researchers have been under his supervision; they have developed and applied innovative technologies to medical devices. He was the CEO (2004~2010) of DailyCare Biomedical Inc. (DCBM) which is a start-up medical device company established in 2004. The company has developed handheld ECGs and new business model in home care applications. One DCBM product earned the annual Excellent Product Award of Taiwan in 2006.

He was the president of Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (2007~2010) and the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medical & Biological Engineering (1999~2007). He is now a Board member of Taiwanese Society of Molecular Imaging, the Director of Center for Medical Device Technology Translation in his university (2011~now), the Chair of Publication Committee & Publicity Committee of International Federation for Medical Biology Engineering (IFMBE) (2009~now), the Co-Chair of Asia Pacific Working Group of IFMBE (2009~now), and the Editor of IFMBE News (2009~now). He is currently leading a team of clinical engineers working on proposed legislation in Taiwan.


[top]                        

     
 John H. Linehan
 

John H. Linehan, Ph.D. is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University (since 2007), and a Consulting Professor of Bioengineering in Stanford University's Biodesign Program (since 2005). He initiated the Stanford-India Biodesign Program and, in 2011/12, is an educational advisor to 5 universities in Ireland to help initiate BioInnovate 每 Ireland, a fellowship program to train medical device innovators.

His current research interests concern the medical device innovation process, regulatory affairs, health technology assessment, and comparative effectiveness.

Dr. Linehan was Vice President of the Whitaker Foundation from 1998 - 2005. He was responsible for implementing and managing major biomedical engineering educational grant programs and for creating and organizing a number of unique programs including the International Biomedical Engineering Educational Summit meetings (2000 & 2005) and the national Academic Leadership Program for developing young faculty as leaders. The Whitaker Foundation, having invested more than $800 million primarily in biomedical engineering education and research in the past 30 years, closed its doors in June 2006.

Prior to joining Whitaker in 1998, Dr. Linehan was the Rose Eannelli-Bagozzi professor of biomedical engineering and the founding Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering (1989) at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Until 1998, he was also adjunct professor of physiology and clinical professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Dr. Linehan is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was a member of the FDA Science Board. He is a fellow and past president of the Biomedical Engineering Society, a founding fellow and past president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a fellow of the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 De-Pei Liu
 

Dr. De-Pei Liu is currently a professor of National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) & Peking Union Medical College (PUMC). Dr. Liu graduated with a Ph.D. from CAMS & PUMC in 1986. He completed his Postdoctoral Fellowship in molecular biology at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and was promoted to be a Professor of CAMS & PUMC in 1992. Dr. Liu*s research expertise is molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, gene regulation and gene therapy. He has published more than 120 original research articles and invited reviews, which have been cited more than 2000 times. Throughout his academic career, Dr. Liu has received numerous awards including three items of awards of Advance of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Health, P.R.China and one item of award of the National Natural Sciences Foundation. He is also serving as a member of Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE), member of Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies and member of Third World Academy of Sciences (TWAS).


[top]                        

     
 Jaakko Malmivuo
 

Jaakko Malmivuo, is Professor Emeritus, Tampere University of Technology, Finland. Jaakko Malmivuo received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, in 1971 and 1976, respectively. From 1974 to 1976 he served as researcher at Stanford University.

In 1976 Jaakko Malmivuo was appointed as Associate Professor and in 1987 Professor of Bioelectromagnetism at Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Tampere, Finland. From 1992 he has been Director of the Ragnar Granit Institute. He has served as Visiting Professor at Technical University of Berlin (West) (1988), Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada (1989), Sophia University, Tokyo (1993), and University of Barcelona (2006). He retired from Tampere University of Technology in 2010.

For over 40 years Dr. Malmivuo has made research in the theory and applications of bioelectric and biomagnetic fields. This discipline he has named Bioelectromagnetism. In Bioelectromagnetism he has made several fundamental contributions which include: first detection of vector magnetocardiogram, solution of the VMCG and MEG measurement sensitivity distributions, solution of the principle of independence/interdependence of bioelectric and biomagnetic measurements and demonstrating it with clinical ECG/MCG measurements, calculation of the spatial sensitivity of EEG and MEG and demonstrating that the EEG has better spatial sensitivity, solution of the sensitivity distribution of impedance tomography. He has over 600 scientific publications and he has co-written with R. Plonsey, "Bioelectromagnetism" (Oxford University Press, New York, 1995).

Dr. Malmivuo has lectured Bioelectromagnetism in several universities around the world. He has developed an Internet education and examination portal EVICAB which is used widely.

Dr. Malmivuo was President of the Finnish Society for Medical Physics and Medical Engineering in 1987-1990. He is Founder Member and was President of the International Society for Bioelectromagnetism 1995-1999. He is founder of the International Journal of Bioelectromagnetism and was Editor in Chief 1999-2006.

In 2003 he was appointed Fellow, International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering, in 2007 Fellow IEEE and in 2008 Honorary Member of the Finnish Society for Medical Physics and Medical Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Roman Maniewski
 

Maniewski is Professor in Technical Sciences and corresponding Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He received the M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Warsaw Technical University in 1962 and the Ph.D. degree in engineering science from the Institute of Applied Cybernetics in 1973. Since 1962 he has worked for the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS) in measurement techniques, automatic control and medical engineering. In 1984每1985 he worked on cardiomagnetism at Helsinki University of Technology in Finland. In 1987每1988 he was appointed as a Visiting Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge USA, where he worked on neuromagnetism. Since 1975 he has been with the Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS in Warsaw where he was the Head of Biophysical Measurements and Imaging Department (1993-2008).

His field of research activity is Biomedical Engineering, especially measurement and analysis of biophysical signals. His current research concerns high-resolution electro- and magnetocardography, laser-Doppler study on microcirculation and near infrared spectroscopy for monitoring and imaging of brain tissue oxygenation and perfusion. He is author or co-author of over 300 publications including 5 books and over 100 peer-reviewed papers in indexed scientific journals and conference proceedings with over 800 citations (H index 13). His research concerned also practical application of developed instrumentations and resulted in 6 patents.

He is a member of the Editorial Board of following indexed journals: Opto-Electronic Review, Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Sciences-Technical Sciences.

In 1998-2013 he served as President of the Polish Society for Biomedical Engineering and currently he is Chairman of the Committee of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS. He is a member of international societies: International Federation for Medical & Biological Engineering, European Society for Engineering & Medicine, European Alliance for Medical & Biological Eng. & Science, SPIE and Internat. Society of Electrocardiology In 2002 he was nominated as a Fellow of the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Andrew McCulloch
 

Dr. Andrew McCulloch is Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine and Jacobs School Distinguished Scholar at the University of California San Diego, where he joined the faculty in 1987. He is member of the UCSD Institute for Engineering in Medicine, the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, a Senior Fellow of the San Diego Supercomputer Center, and a member of the UCSD Center for Research on Biological Systems. Dr. McCulloch is a Principal Investigator of the National Biomedical Computation Resource and Co-Director of the Cardiac Biomedical Science and Engineering Center at UCSD. He served as Vice Chair of the Bioengineering Department from 2002 to 2005 and Chair from 2005 to 2008. Dr. McCulloch is Director of the HHMI-NIBIB Interfaces Graduate Training Program and the accompanying UCSD Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Specialization in Multi-Scale Biology.

Dr. McCulloch was educated at the University of Auckland, New Zealand in Engineering Science and Physiology receiving his Ph.D. in 1986. Dr. McCulloch was an NSF Presidential Young Investigator. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Cardiovascular Section of the American Physiological Society. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Bio-Medical Engineering Society, and is currently Associate Editor of the Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing and PLoS Computational Biology and co-Editor-in-Chief of Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models. He is on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology and Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering. He has given the Konrad Witzig Memorial Lecture and the Donald Wassenberg Memorial Lecture. He is also chair of the Physiome and Systems Biology Committee of the International Union of Physiological Sciences.

Dr. McCulloch*s lab uses experimental and computational models to investigate the relationships between the cellular and extracellular structure of cardiac muscle and the electrical and mechanical function of the whole heart during ventricular remodeling, heart failure and arrhythmia. Current interests include developing multi-scale models of myocyte excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms and their regulation by PKA and CaMKII. Dr. McCulloch's group has also scaled cellular level models of these processes up to the tissue and organ scales to investigate mechanisms of arrhythmias and ventricular dysfunction associated with targeted gene defects and congestive heart failure. Genetically engineered mice are an important model system for developing and validating these computational models. Important phenotyping techniques in the mouse include optical electrical mapping, isolated muscle mechanics testing and magnetic resonance imaging. A second major area of research in the lab has been the role of cytoskeletal and membrane proteins in cardiac myocyte mechanotransduction mechanisms and how defects in costameric and z-disk protein complexes can alter mechanotransduction and lead to dilated cardiomyopathy. The effects of stretch on myocyte membrane configuration and electrical conduction are also under investigation. Finally, we have been using Drosophila as a model system to explore hypoxia tolerance and susceptibility mechanisms in conjunction with metabolomics and metabolic network modeling.


[top]                        

     
 Joachim Nagel
 

Joachim H. Nagel is Professor and Chairman of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Stuttgart since 1996. He received his MS degree in Physics & Electronics at the University of Saarbruecken in 1973, and his D.Sc. at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany in 1979. Following appointments in industry and as a faculty member at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Prof. Nagel joined the University of Miami, Florida, USA, in 1986, as Professor of Biomedical Engineering (1986-96), Radiology (1990-96), and Clinical Psychophysiology (1988-1996), Director of the Medical Imaging & Instrumentation Lab (1986-1996), and Director of Biomedical Engineering at the Behavioral Medicine Research Center (1986-1996).

Prof. Nagel served as the President of the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (2006-2009) and the President of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (2003-2006). He is a co-founder of the European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering and Sciences (EAMBES) and became the founding Chairman of its Division of Academic Programs and Research Institutes. Joachim Nagel is a member of the Scientific Council of the International Centre for Bio-Cybernetics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, a Founding Fellow of Biomedical Engineering Society and EAMBES, a Fellow of the Institute of Physics, the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering as well as an Academician Member of the UNESCO/UATI World Academy of Biomedical Technologies. He is an honorary life member of the IFMBE and an honorary member of the Czech Society for Biomedical Engineering and Medical Informatics. Prof. Nagel is the leader of the European project BIOMEDEA 每 Biomedical Engineering Preparing for the European Higher Education Area, from 2004 to 2010 he headed the IFMBE participation in the WHO World Alliances on Patient Safety and the Global Health Workforce, and, as an IFMBE representative to the WHO General Assembly and Executive Committee, participated in the formulation of WHO resolutions concerning health technologies. He was co-chair (2006-2009) and chair (2009-2012) of the IUPESM Health Technology and Training Task Force which is supporting developing countries with regard to health and health care technologies. In cooperation with the International Labour Organization (ILO) he established global recognition of biomedical engineers as an integral part of the health work force within the United Nations system (2009).

In 2012, Dr. Nagel received the Award of Merit from the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (IUPESM).

Joachim Nagel is the founding editor of the IUPESM/Springer journal Health and Technology (2010) and the series editor of the IFMBE/Springer Book Series on Biomedical Engineering (since 2006). He was a series editor for the IFMBE Proceedings (2001-2009) and an editor of the IOPP Book Series in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (2001-05), he served as an editor for the BMES journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering (1989-94), the IOPP journal Physiological Measurement (1994-98), and he was a member of numerous Editorial and Review Boards.

Prof. Nagel has published more than 280 scientific papers, books, book chapters, monographs, editorials, patents and conference papers. His main research interests are in the fields of cardiovascular monitoring, instrumentation and physiology, medical image acquisition and image processing, physiological signals, neurosciences, biological effects as well as therapeutic applications of ultrasound, and patient safety.


[top]                        

     
 Maciej Nalecz
 

Professor Maciej Nalecz (1922-2009), full Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences was a prominent Polish scientist, pioneer in the field of biomedical engineering. He was first director of the Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences (1975 to 1993), which was later renamed after his name to the Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS.

He received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the Electrical Engineering Department of the Warsaw University of Technology in 1949 and 1954, respectively. In 1961 he obtained one year postdoctoral fellowship at the Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1967每1968 he was appointed as a Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, N.Y., USA. In 1962每1972 he was director of the Institute of Automatic Control of the Polish Academy of Sciences. In 1972 he was nominated for the Professor and Secretary of Technical Sciences Division at the Polish Academy of Sciences. In 1979/80 he worked as a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Center at the Ohio State University in Columbus and in 1991 he was awarded one year position of Scholar-in-Residence at the Fogarty International Center of the NIH.

His research interests include magnetic measurements, Hall-effect application in measurement technique, automatic control systems and finally bionics and biomedical engineering. His personal research in the field of biomedical engineering concerned mainly biotransducers and artificial organs, especially control and optimization of the hemodialysis process in artificial kidney and control and monitoring of insulin delivery in artificial pancreas. He is author or co-author of over 300 publications including books, articles in scientific journals and conference proceedings.

In 1972-2007 prof. Nalecz served as Chairman of the Committee of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS and since 1988 he was director of the International Centre of Biocybernetics PAS - a multi-national association of the Academies of Science. In 1985每1989 he was a member of the Polish Parliament, belonging to the Non-Party Members Club.

Prof. Nalecz was involved in many international organizations. From 1962 till 1987 he took an active part in the works of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) serving as Chairman of the Instrumentation and the Biomedical Engineering Committees. In 1962每1976 he was engaged in the activities of the International Measurement Cooperation (IMECO) as well as in the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA-ICSU). In 1988- 1993 prof. Nalecz was a Member of the Administrative Council of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE). He was founding member of the International Academy of Biomedical Engineering and elected to the Academy Executive Committee for the period 1997每2000. In 2000 he was elected to the ※life time honorary member of IFMBE§. Prof. Nalecz was founder of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine and in 1993 he was elected Vice President of ESEM. Since 1972 prof Nalecz was Chairman of the Polish PUGWASH Committee and from 1974 till 1997 the chairman of the PUGWASH Council. Professor Nalecz was awarded by several Polish and international distinctions. Among them: Commander Cross with Star of ※Polonia Restituta§, Polish Prime Minister Award for ※Outstanding scientific achievements§, ※Copernicus Medal§ the only award given for scientific achievements by the Polish Academy of Sciences, ※Med tack fur verteful insatz§ given by Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, ※Krizik Medal§ for engineering achievements given by the Chechoslovak Academy of Sciences, ※John E. Fogarty Medal§ given by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.


[top]                        

     
 Robert M. Nerem
 

Dr. Nerem joined Georgia Tech in 1987 as the Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair for Engineering in Medicine. He is an Institute Professor Emeritus and he serves as the Associate Director of an NSF Science and Technology Center for the Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) where MIT is the lead institution. Up until 2011 he served as the Director of the Georgia Tech/Emory Center (GTEC) for Regenerative Medicine, a center established by an NSF Engineering Research Center award in 1998. In 1995 he was the Founding Director of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an interdisciplinary organization that brought biochemistry, bioengineering, and biology together. He served in this capacity until 2009. Professor Nerem received his Ph.D. in 1964 from Ohio State University and joined the faculty there in the Department of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, being promoted to Professor in 1972 and serving from 1975-1979 as Associate Dean for Research in the Graduate School. From 1979 to 1986 he was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston. Professor Nerem is the author of more than 200 publications. He is a past President of the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (1991-1994) and also a past President of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (1988-91). In addition, he is a past Chairman of the U.S. National Committee on Biomechanics (1988-91), and he is a Fellow and was the founding President (1992-1994) of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He is past President of the Tissue Engineering Society International (2002-2004), the forerunner of the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS) and he was a part-time Senior Advisor for Bioengineering in the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health (2003-2006). He is Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Fellow, Council of Arteriosclerosis, American Heart Association; Fellow, American Physical Society; and Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He was Technical Editor of the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering (1988-1997). In 1989 he received the H.R. Lissner Award from ASME and in 2002 the Pierre Galletti Award from AIMBE. In 1988 Professor Nerem was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and he served on the NAE Council for six years (1998 - 2004). In 1992 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and in 1998 a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1994 he was elected a Foreign Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences and in 1998 he was made an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in the United Kingdom. In 2004 he was elected an honorary foreign member of the Japan Society for Medical and Biological Engineering, and in 2006 a Foreign Member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences. In 2008 Professor Nerem was selected by NAE for the Founders Award. Professor Nerem holds honorary doctorates from the University of Paris, Imperial College London, and Illinois Institute of Technology. Research interests include biomechanics, cardiovascular devices, cellular engineering, vascular biology, and tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.


[top]                        

     
 Shuming Nie
 

Professor Nie received his BS degree from Nankai University (China) in 1983, earned his MS and PhD degrees from Northwestern University (1984-1990), and did postdoctoral research at both Georgia Institute of Technology and Stanford University (1990-1994). He is currently the Wallace H. Coulter Distinguished Chair Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, with joint appointments in chemistry, materials science and engineering, and hematology and oncology. His research is in the areas of molecular engineering and nanotechnology, with a focus on bioconjugated nanoparticles for cancer molecular imaging, molecular profiling, and targeted therapy. His major academic achievements include the discovery of colloidal metal nanoparticles that are able to amplify the efficiencies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by 14-15 orders of magnitude, his pioneering work on water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots, and his breakthrough work in developing multifunctional smart nanoparticles for integrated biomedical imaging and therapy, including image-guided cancer surgery. Professor Nie has published over 290 papers, patents, and book chapters, and his scholarly work has been cited more than 35,000 times.

Professor Nie has received many awards and honors including a Special Achievement Award in Nanomedicine from Nature (2012), Fellow of the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), ※Deal of the Year§ Award in Technology Licensing (Emory University, 2012), the NIH Director*s Transformative Research Award (2011), ※Innovation of the Year§ Award (Emory University, 2010), the ※MilliPub§ Award (for 4 publications with more than 1000 citations each) (2010), the Merck Award in Analytical Chemistry (2007), the Georgia Cancer Coalition (GCC) Special Achievement Award (2007), Elected Fellow of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (2006), the Cheung Kong Professorship (The Ministry of Education of China, 2006), the Rank Prize in Opto-electronics (London, UK, 2005), the Georgia Distinguished Cancer Scholar Award (Georgia Cancer Coalition, 2002-2007), the Beckman Young Investigator Award, the National Collegiate Inventors Award, and the NSFC Overseas Young Scholar Award.


[top]                        

     
 Peter Niederer
 

Peter Niederer was born in 1941 and graduated from the University of Zurich in Theoretical Physics in 1967. He obtained his Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland in 1972. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering of the University and ETH Zurich, from where he left in 1973 to work as a research engineer at the General Motors Research Laboratories in Warren, Michigan. After having returned to the Institute in Zurich, he concentrated his research mainly in the areas of biomechanics and medical optics.

In 1980, he was a Visiting Faculty Member at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Houston, Texas and in 2001 he spent his sabbatical at the City College in New York. In 1987 he became full Professor of Biomedical Engineering at ETH Zurich in the Departments of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. From 1994 每 1997 he served as Head of the Division of Mechanical and Process Engineering and from 1997 每 1999 he was Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering of ETH.

In 1982 he received the Georg Friedrich Gotz Award and in 1984 the Technical Award of the Automobile Club of Switzerland. In 2003 he became Fellow of IAMBE, in 2009 Honorary member of the European Society of Biomechanics.

The research projects of his group were mainly related to soft tissue mechanics, trauma biomechanics, tissue/fluid interaction, high-definition endoscopy, and medical applications of near-infrared spectroscopy. Besides, new technical procedures aiming at on-line 3D imaging by way of unltrasound were investigated. Projects in soft tissue mechanics included cardiodynamics in collaboration with the MRI group at the Institute, as well as modeling of organ dynamics for virtual reality-based surgical simulators. In trauma biomechanics, vehicle-pedestrian impacts as well as the analysis of minor neck injuries ("whiplash") was in the foreground.

Peter Niederer is cofounder of various companies. This includes Scanco Medical, a manufacturer of high-precision laboratory micro CT systems and the Working Group for Accident Mechanics, each together with four of his colleagues. This Foundation is engaged in research, development and consulting in the area of injury biomechanics. Furthermore, NeMoDevices, specializing in IR monitoring of brain activity was founded and Swiss Experts Certification that certifies expert witnesses according to EU standards was initiated.

He has been a reviewer for EU programs related to biomedical engineering and he is editor-in-chief of the journal Technology and Health Care.


[top]                        

     
 Benno M. Nigg
 

Prof. Dr. Benno M. Nigg is the president and CEO of Biomechanigg Research Inc. He has a doctorate in natural sciences (Physics) from the ETH Zurich (Switzerland).

From 1976 to 1981 he was the Director of the Biomechanics Laboratory of the ETH Zurich. In 1981, he was appointed Professor of Biomechanics in the Faculties of Kinesiology, Engineering and Medicine at the University of Calgary. He founded and directs the world famous Human Performance Laboratory (HPL), which currently has more than 100 co-workers.

Recently, the research activities of the HPL have been assessed by independent external reviewers as ※....the best in the world in Clinical Biomechanical Research§ and ※... gold standard of scientific work in this field...§.

Dr. Nigg*s research and consulting activities concentrate on load of the lower extremities during human locomotion. He has developed new paradigms for impact loading and for orthotic development, stressing the importance of muscles in control and protection. He had a major influence in the development of sport shoes and many functional features have been developed in his research center.

He is author of more than 275 scientific publications and the recipient of many awards (e.g. Olympic Order, Alberta Science and Technology Award) and elected member of three Scientific Academies.

Dr. Nigg has several honorary doctoral degrees and Professorships among them a honorary doctoral degree from the University of Salzburg and the University of Innsbruck (Austria).


[top]                        

     
 P. Ake Oberg
 

Per Ake Oberg, born 1937 in Harnosand, is a Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering at Linkoping University, Sweden.

Oberg received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1964 from Chalmers University of Technology and his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering in 1971 from Uppsala University. In 1963-1972 he worked as a Research Associate at Uppsala University, Department of Physiology and Medical Biophysics. He is since 1972 Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Linkoping University. He is also active at the Linkoping University Hospital.

Oberg's research interests are in circulatory physiology, bio-optics, biomedical instrumentation, sensors and clinical engineering. He has published over 500 scientific papers and books in these areas.

Oberg is the founding chairman of the Clinical Engineering Division of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering in 1980. This same organization has also elected him as an honorary life member. He is a former President of the Swedish Society of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering at two 2-year periods and a former chairman of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering within IFMBE.

Oberg is a Fellow of The Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences as well a Fellow of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He is Honorary Member of the Hungarian Academy of Engineering Sciences and a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He received the Fernstrom prize 1982, the Walker Ames Award 1983 and the Zworykin Award of IFMBE 2003.

Oberg is a Honorary Member of the Finnish, Japanese and the Polish Societies for Biomedical Engineering


[top]                        

     
 Marc Nyssen
 

Marc Nyssen obtained his PhD. degree in 1983 at the Free University Brussels in Electrical Engineering. Currently he is Professor of Medical Informatics at Free University Brussels (VUB). From early on his research interests have focused on information technology and its applications in healthcare. He has pioneered several initiatives that today are taken as defaults. As an example, he is the co-founder of the "Belgian Unix systems Users Group" associated with the EurOpen European federation of national user groups. The BUUG introduced and ran the EUnet network, Belgium∩s first Internet connection between 1986 and 1994.

His is interested in different aspects of the computerized production lines, mainly for the scientist, with emphasis on network communication aspects. Image processing related hardware and software systems and eHealth, i.e. medical Internet applications and Electronic medical records are examples of areas where he has contributed. Currently he is responsible for a Belgium wide project which consists of the introduction of electronic medical prescriptions in Belgium. He is also coordinator of the Flemish inter-university masters in Biomedical Engineering and in Medical data management, a member of the Belgian ※Health telematics Commission§ and Chairman of VLIRUOS, the Flemish university council responsible for academic cooperation projects, worldwide.

As National Secretary of the Belgium IFMBE Affiliate he has represented Belgium in the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE) from the early 90*s onwards. He is co-founder and Secretary General of the Belgian National Committee on Biomedical Engineering within the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences and Fine Arts. Currently he is a member of IFMBE Administrative Council.


[top]                        

     
 Kazuo Ogino
    

Mr. Ogino has served as the top executive of Nihon Kohden, Japan's leading manufacturer and provider of medical electronic equipment, for over 20 years. Under his leadership, the company has grown to become an international billion dollar company. He has also moved the medical device industry in a very positive direction as chairman of The Japan Federation of Medical Devices Associations (JFMDA). JFMDA is an umbrella group of 20 industry groups and 4900 companies for the purpose of improving the welfare and health care in Japan.

His leadership has contributed to the advancement of medical technology. His achievements and reputation in Japan earned him the Japanese Blue Ribbon Medal for significant contributions to Japan*s electronic and medical equipment industry.


[top]                        

     
 Nicolas Pallikarakis
 

Nicolas Pallikarakis is Professor of Medical Physics and Director of the Postgraduate Program on Biomedical Technology at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Patras, Greece. He also holds various key posts such as Head of the Biomedical Technology Unit (BITU) of the Department of Medical Physics, University of Patras and Chairman of the Institute of Biomedical Technology (INBIT), an independent, non-profit Organization, contributing to the promotion of the Biomedical Engineering sector in Greece, since its establishment in 1991.

His research interests include Medical Imaging and Simulation, Medical Instrumentation and Management of Medical Technology. He has been the Coordinator of more than 30 projects, approved and financed by European or Greek competitive programs regarding research and development. He has also been the Supervisor of more than 50 Master and 20 PhD theses.

His research activities have been published in about 100 articles in international scientific journals and books of conference proceedings. He has also had active participation in more than 150 international conferences, seminars and workshops, often as an invited speaker, and has organized more than 40 scientific events held both in Greece and abroad. He is the author or coauthor of 3 scientific books, 2 specific studies and 3 educational / training software, editor or coeditor of 6 books and conference proceedings and peer reviewer of international scientific Journals and many Conference proceedings.

He is involved in many EU and international activities related to Biomedical Engineering and Medical Informatics. Amongst them: He has been appointed as member to the CEN Health Forum, National representative in the Advanced Informatics in Medicine (AIM) and then the Health Telematics (HT) WGs of the DG XIII, Member of the Medical Devices Committee of the DG III, Member of the informal International Medical Device Group (IMDG) since 1985, Elected member of the Clinical Engineering Division Board of the IFMBE and its Chairman for the period 1994-1997, Elected member and Chairman of the Healthcare Technology Assessment Division of the IFMBE in 2012, and Founding member of the EAMBES Fellows. Nicolas Pallikarakis is also Professor Honoris Causa of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and an Elected Member of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE).


[top]                        

     
 Xiaochuan Pan
 

Xiaochuan Pan received his B.S. in Nuclear Physics from Beijing University, China in 1982, M.S. in Atomic Physics from the Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of China in 1985. After coming as a graduate student to the Department of Physics at The University of Chicago in 1986, he received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Atomic Physics from The University of Chicago in 1988 and 1991, respectively. Following his Ph.D. training, he joined the Department of Radiology initially as a Post-doctoral fellow and late as an NIH training fellow and a Research Associate.

In 1994, he was appointed as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago. He was promoted subsequently to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure in 2001, and of Professor with tenure in 2006, in the Department of Radiology at The University of Chicago. He also holds currently appointments as a Professor in the Department of Radiation & Cellular Oncology, the Committee on Medical Physics, and the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of Chicago.

His research interest centers on physics, algorithms, engineering, and applications of tomographic imaging. He and his team have performed research in a number of areas of medical imaging, including molecular imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, photo-acoustic imaging, phase-contrast imaging, diffraction tomography, and image-quality-assessment methodology. His current projects focus primarily on the development advanced algorithms in X-ray-based tomographic imaging with goals to enable new imaging systems, workflows, and applications of practical utility. He and his team have made contributions to the development of advanced algorithms and systems for tomographic imaging. Their developed algorithms, and systems enabled by the algorithms, have found applications not only to medical and biological imaging applications but also to security imaging and non-destructive inspection.

He is the recipient of numerous awards such as IEEE NPSS Early Achievement Award, IEEE EMBS Technical Award, and the Rotblatt Medal for 2012 Physics in Medicine and Biology Citations Prize. He is also a Fellow of AAPM, AIMBE, IAMBE, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE. He has served as a chair and/or a reviewer of study sections/review panels for funding agencies, including NIH, NSF, NSFC, and NSERC; as an associate editor (or editorial board member) for journals in the medical imaging related fields such as IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging, IEEE Trans. Biomed Eng., IEEE J. Transl. Eng. Health and Med., Phys. Biol. Med., Med. Phys., SPIE J. Med. Imaging, J. Cardiovascular CT, and Computerized Med. Imaging and Graphics, X-ray Sci. Tech.; as a chair/member of technical committees of professional organizations such as IEEE and RSNA, and as a chair/member of conferences, programs, themes, and technical/scientific committees for professional conferences such as IEEE EMBC, IEEE MIC, RSNA, AAPM, and MICCIA.


[top]                        

     
 John P Paul
 

Professor Paul studied at the Royal College of Science and Technology, Glasgow (which became the University of Strathclyde) leading to a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Glasgow. He obtained his PhD under the same arrangement between the 2 institutions. His thesis was concerned with the measurement of the forces in the hip joint during walking. This work was greatly received because it followed John Charnley's first successful hip joint replacement.

The gait work at Strathclyde began after a visit by Inman's Berkeley team. Notable developments were the 3D Vicon motion analysis system, designed by Prof. Paul with his PhD students, Mick Jarrett and Brian Andrews. Other important contributions were made by Jim, Morrison, Stefan Solomonides and Sandy Nichol.

Prof. Paul was head of the Wolfson Bioengineering unit at the University of Strathclyde from 1982 until 1995, and was president of the International Society for Biomechanics from 1987 to 1989 and delivered the Muybridge Lecture' to open the Biannual meeting of that Society in Tokyo.


[top]                        

     
 Antonio Pedotti
 

Antonio Pedotti is Professor of Biomedical Technologies at the Politecnico di Milano where he has been Chairman of the Bioengineering Dept., Member of the Academic Senate and Director of the Biomedical Technologies Lab (TBM-Lab) (www.tbmlab.polimi.it).

He has been Assistant Professor at the University of California-Berkeley and Founder and Director of the Bioengineering Center of the Politecnico and the Scientific Medical Institute Don Gnocchi where he was appointed also as Scientific Director. He has been member of the Superior Health Council of the Italian Government and national representative in the COMAC-BME of the EU. He is President of the A.I.I.M.B. (It. Ass. of Med. and Biological Eng.) and has been Chairman of the ESEM (Eur. Soc. of Eng. and Med.), ISEK (Int. Soc. of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology) and SIAMOC (It. Soc. for Movement Analysis in Clinics). He is member of the Istituto Lombardo di Science e Lettered Academy. Prof. Pedotti has been member of the Editorial Board of various scientific journals and Project Leader of many EU Projects.

His interdisciplinary research activities on bioengineering, computational modelling and IT applied to biological systems and medicine have been focused on:
- Movement science, neuromotor control and learning, motor disorders and rehabilitation, prostheses, biomechanics, ergonomics, where he gave a special contribution by developing the ※Pedotti diagram§ of gait and the Elite System for 3D movement analysis;
- Technical aids, devices and services for rehabilitation and recovery of functions in disabled persons including the development of the Service for Information and Evaluation of Technical Aids (SIVA) which has been the model for the European Network;
- Cardiovascular system and technologies for blood pressure measuring and processing focused on analysis of baroreflex control and hypertension;
- Cancer treatment by image guided radiotherapy and hadrontherapy aimed on developing innovative technologies for computer aided patient positioning and tumour targeting;
- Respiratory function, lung modelling and related pathologies including the development of Optoelectronic Plethysmography (OEP) for a better understanding of mechanics of breathing and of Force Oscillation Technique (FOT) opening new ways for detecting Expiratory Flow Limitation (EFL), improving mechanical ventilation and home monitoring of chronic diseases like COPD and asthma.

His scientific activity is documented by more than 300 scientific papers, books and patents. Many of his patents have been licensed to national and international Companies and promoted the creation of innovative spin-off to transfer results of research into medical applications and products to help patients by improving diagnosis, treatment and health services.


[top]                        

     
 Robert Plonsey
 

Robert Plonsey is Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering at the Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University. He joined the faculty in 1983. He retired in 1996 as the Pfizer Inc./Edmund T. Pratt Jr. University Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1956. From 1957 to 1983, he was with Case Institute of Technology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, where he was first a member of the Electrical Engineering Faculty and then one of the founders of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. From 1976 to 1980, he served as Department Chairman.

He is well respected in the biomedical engineering field. He received a distinguished service award from the BME Society at the 2004 annual meeting in Philadelphia. Also, in 2004 he was the recipient of the prestigious Ragnar Granit Prize for his contributions to promoting bioelectromagnetism and biomedical engineering at an international level. He was cited for his work as honorary president of the International Society of Bioelectromagnetism, his book on the subject and his many preconference and graduate courses.

His research interests are in modeling applied to electrocardiology, electrophysiology and functional electrical stimulation. He is author or co-author of several books on electromagnetic theory and bioelectromagnetism including Bioelectric Phenomena (1969), Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach (with Roger Barr 1988) and Bioelectromagnetism: Principles and Applications of Bioelectric and Biomagnetic Fields (with Jaakko Malmivuo 1995).

Dr. Plonsey has served on committees and been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, National Research Council and the Whitaker Foundation. From 1970 to 1972 he was President of IEEE/EMBS and from 1990 to 1991 Vice President for Technical and Conference Activities. In 1992 he was co-program chair for the IEEE/EMBS annual conference (Paris, France). Dr. Plonsey was president of the BME society in 1981 and 1982, and has served as a board member for the society.

He is a Fellow of AAAS and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1997 he was presented the Merit Award by the IUPESM and is a Founding Member of the AIMBE and the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 L谷andre Pourcelot
 

L谷andre Pourcelot, PhD, MD, is now retired. He was born on September 7, 1940, in Orchamps-Vennes, France. He obtained the electrical engineering degree from the Institut National des Sciences Appliqu谷es, Lyon, France, in 1963, and a Ph.D. at Lyon in 1967. He completed medical studies and obtained the MD degree from the Faculty of medicine at the University of Tours in 1977, where he also obtained a degree in nuclear medicine in 1980. From 1980 to 2006, he was Professor of Biophysics, Francois Rabelais University, Tours, France, www.univ-tours.fr and Head of the Department of Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound at the University Hospital www.chu-tours.fr.

He began his professional career in 1963 as a researcher at INSA, Lyon, where he developed the first European ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. In 1968, he joined the Faculty of Medicine in Tours, France, where he was assistant, associate, and then full Professor. He also was director of the Group of Public interest GIP ※Ultrasound§ and of the INSERM research Unit 316 (www.inserm.fr).

His research activities dealt with ultrasonic instrumentation and clinical applications, and he was principal investigator of several experiments in the field of space physiology. In 1972 he and his research group developed one of the first real-time ultrasound imaging systems based on the electronic scanning of a linear array. Pourcelot was one of the pioneers in clinical Doppler vascular research. In 1974 he described the "Resistance Index" or the "Pourcelot index". In 1977 he described pioneering work on colour-coded Doppler images. He led a team of researchers and clinicians who had devised important and creative experiments in the application of Doppler ultrasound in adult vascular diseases as well as in the assessment of foetal conditions, and designed many innovative apparatuses for the purpose. They were also responsible for important pioneer work on space physiology and medicine, including the first echograph used on board a space vehicle (1982). Other works included the use of high frequency ultrasound transducers, and techniques in the study of newborn cerebral function, physiology and pathophysiology, and with particular reference to the preterm baby.

Pourcelot co-founded several industrial companies, as well as the French Society for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (1972) www.sfaumb.fr and the French Doppler Club (1975). He is a member of WFUMB, and was president and member of a good number of learned societies.

In 1995 Pourcelot was presented the prestigious IEEE Judith A. Resnik Award for his work on ultrasound imaging in the measurement of cardiovascular systems during space flight. In 2003, he was honoured with the Ian Donald Gold Medal for Technical Merit from the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (ISUOG).


[top]                        

     
 Jose Principe
 

Jose C. Principe is Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida since 2002. He is BellSouth Professor and Founding Director of the University of Florida Computational Neuro-Engineering Laboratory (CNEL). He joined the University of Florida in 1987, after an eight year appointment as Professor at the University of Aveiro, in Portugal. Dr. Principe holds degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Porto, Portugal, University of Florida, USA (Master and Ph.D.), and Honoris Causa degrees from the Universita Mediterranea in Reggio Calabria, Italy, Universidade do Maranhao, Brazil and Aalto University, Finland.

Dr. Principe is a Fellow of the IEEE (2000) and of the AIMBE (2006), and recipient of the INNS Gabor Award, the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Career Achievement Award, and the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society Neural Network Pioneer Award. He served as President of the International Neural Network Society in 2004, as Editor in Chief of the IEEE Transactions of Biomedical Engineering from 2001 to 2007, and as a member of the Advisory Science Board of the FDA from 2001 to 2004. He is currently the Founding Editor in Chief of the IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering. He has been heavily involved in conference organization and several IEEE society administrative committees. Dr. Principe chaired 68 Ph.D. and 61 Master student committees, and he is author of more than 600 refereed publications (5 books, 7 edited books, 19 book chapters, 201 journal papers and 427 conference proceedings). He holds 15 patents and has submitted seven more. He was one the founding partners of NeuroDimension Incorporated, which commercializes since 1993 NeuroSolutions, a neural network package sold in 77 countries.


[top]                        

     
 Basil Proimos
 

Basil Proimos was born in February 1930 and died in June 2011 in Chania, Crete.

He received his degree in Mechanical and Electrical Engineer from the Technical University of Athens in 1953, followed by a Master of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, USA in 1958. Prof. Proimos completed his PhD thesis and obtained a Doctorate on Electrical Engineering from the Technical University of Athens in 1965.

From 1959 to 1977, he was the Director of the Medical Physics Department of the Greek Anticancer Institute in Athens. In 1977, he became a Professor of Medical Physics and the Director of the Medical Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, at the University of Patras, Greece, a position he kept until 1997, when he became an Emeritus Professor. In the period 1986-1988, he was the Rector of the University of Patras.

Prof. Proimos' research interests were mainly focused on the Physics of Radiotherapy and the development of Conformal Radiotherapy Techniques using protection of vital organs by absorbers rotating synchronously with the patient (1957-1960) and by gravity oriented devices (1960-2002), known internationally as ※Proimos Devices§. From 1994 to 1997 he was coordinator of the DYNARAD (DYNAmic RADiotherapy) "concerted action", involving 30 radiotherapy centers within the European Union. He has published numerous articles on Physics of Radiotherapy in international refereed journals, seven technical and scientific books and he holds two patents for an original radiotherapy unit (UK, Japan).

For many years, Professor Proimos was the driving force, as organizer, coordinator and teacher of the European MSc programs in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering that are still offered at the University of Patras, for more than 25 years now in collaboration with many other EU Universities. More than 1000 students, from Greece and abroad have followed these two postgraduate programs. In addition, he was the Coordinator of the TEMPERE ※Thematic Network§ and the Curriculum Development of an Advanced (CDA) Course on Training and Education for Medical Physics and Engineering Reform in Europe involving 38 EU Universities and 10 Scientific/ Professional Organizations.

Prof. Proimos was a member of many Greek and International Societies and obtained many prices and distinctions, among which it is worth mentioning: the Prize of the ※Empiricos Foundation§, Athens, Greece in 1975, the ERASMUS Prize, Brussels, Belgium in 1991, the ※Otto Schmitt§ Award for Exceptional Contribution to the Advancement of the Field of Medical and Biological Engineering by the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), Sydney, Australia in 2003.

In 2002, he returned to his homeland Crete and became a predominant hotelier. However, he still continued to make presentations on Medical and Bioengineering fields or on subjects of interest to the local society. He was a natural orator, full of vitality, strength and humor. His original ideas, intelligence and vision inspired a lot of people. There are generations of students who followed his advice and continued his work all around the world and will continue to do so. His contribution to Science and Society will not be forgotten!


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 Buddy D. Ratner
 

Buddy D. Ratner is Director of the University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials (UWEB21) Engineering Research Center. He holds the Michael L. and Myrna Darland Endowed Chair in Technology Commercialization and is Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Washington.

Buddy Ratner received his Ph.D. (1972) in Polymer Chemistry from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. He has been at the University of Washington since 1972. From 1985-1996, he directed the National Institutes of Health-funded National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical Problems. In 1996, he assumed the directorship of UWEB (now UWEB21).

Ratner is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE), the AVS (formerly the American Vacuum Society), the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the International College of Fellows Biomaterials Science and Engineering. In 2002, Ratner was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering, USA. He is a past president of the Society for Biomaterials. He served as president of AIMBE (2002-2003). In 2003 he was elected President of the Tissue Engineering Society of North America. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Bioimaging and Bioengineering, NIH (2009-2013).

Ratner has won numerous awards. A partial list includes the Medard W. Welch Award of the AVS (2002), Founders Award of the Society for Biomaterials (2004), C. William Hall Award from the Society for Biomaterials (2006), the BMES Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award (2008), the Acta Biomaterialia gold medal (2009), the University of Washington Faculty Lecture (2011) and the Pierre Galletti Award from the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (2011).

He has authored over 400 scholarly works and has over 20 issued patents. He is Editor of the Journal of Undergraduate Research in BioEngineering, on the advisory board of Biointerphases and serves on the editorial boards of ten other journals. He is the lead editor for Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, a textbook that has sold over 25,000 copies.

Buddy Ratner*s interests include biomaterials, tissue engineering, polymers, biocompatibility, drug delivery, surface analysis, self-assembly, nanobiotechnology, RF-plasma thin film deposition, technology commercialization and biomaterials education. He has participated in the launch of six companies based on technologies from his laboratory, and serves as a consultant for numerous other companies.


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 Guenter Rau
 

Guenter Rau is Professor of Biomedical Engineering at RWTH Aachen University, Faculties of EEE and of Medicine. His background is Electrical Engineering (M.S.) and Biology (Ph.D.). He was a founding director of the Helmholtz-Institute for BME at Aachen from 1976 to 2004. His research is focused on Biomechanics of Movement, of the Cardiovascular System and of Ergonomics, on Cryobiology and on Electrophysiology. In addition to about 400 publications and to supervision of more than 150 Ph.D. students, he has been engaged in founding several spin-off companies.

He served in many capacities and functions such as President ISB and ISEK, President German Society of Biomedical Engineering, Member of the German Computer Board of the DFG, Associate Editor of IEEE-BME Transactions, and consultant to the European Commission, to Swiss, Austrian, Swedish, British and German Governments and authorities.

He received numerous acknowledgements, and he is a life fellow of IEEE as well as an appointed founding fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Robert S Reneman
 

Robert S Reneman is professor emeritus at the Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM) of Maastricht University, in the Netherlands. He received his MD degree at the University of Amsterdam in 1961 and his PhD degree in clinical physiology at the University of Utrecht and became a registered anesthesiologist at the Academic Hospital Utrecht in 1966. He worked as an anesthesiologist at the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of this hospital from 1966 till 1970. From 1970 till 1972 he trained in physiology and bioengineering at the Virginia Mason Research Center and the University of Washington in Seattle, USA.

After a short period at the Janssen Research Foundation in Beerse, Belgium as head of the Life Science Department, he became professor of physiology at Maastricht University in 1974 and was chairman of the department till 1990. At Maastricht University he became responsible for the cardiovascular research program and founded CARIM in 1988. He was scientific director of this institute till 1999. From 1985 till 1999 he was also professor of physiology at the Technical University in Eindhoven and is affiliate professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA since 1990. He is Honorary Professor at the Institute for Microcirculation of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. He was visiting professor in Berlin (1975) and in Seattle (1976 and 1985). His research interest includes cardiovascular (patho)physiology and the development and application of non-invasive vascular ultrasound. He served as principal investigator on many project and program grants funded by the Netherlands Foundation of Scientific Research, the Dutch Heart Foundation and the European Union.

He has hold many honorary positions, among which, President of the European Society for Microcirculation, President of the Federation of European Physiological Societies, Vice President and President of The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and member of the Board of Trustees of Leiden University. He is a member of Academia Europeae, the European Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium and of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.

He served on the board of such international journals as Circulation Research, Microvascular Research, News in Physiological Sciences, Cardiovascular Research and the European Journal of Physiology (Field Editor and Executive Editor) and serves on the board of Ultrasound in Medicine ad Biology since its founding in 1978. He is a member of societies as the American Physiological Society (elected fellow of the Cardiovascular Section), the European Society of Cardiology (elected fellow), the American Heart Association (elected fellow) and the Microcirculatory Society.

He received a variety of honors and awards, among which the Malpighi Award of the European Society for Microcirculation (Stockholm, 2000), and he is Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion and Commandeur de la L谷gion d*Honneur.

He is the (co)author of 452 papers in international refereed journals, 156 books and book chapters and the supervisor of 65 PhD theses.


[top]                        

     
 James B. Reswick
 

Dr. Reswick is the Retired Associate Director, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education.









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 Nandor Richter
 

Nandor Richter, FF, FE, M.Sc. Electrical Engineering, M.A.Science (Physics)

President IFMBE 1985-1988, Vice President IUPESM 1988-1991, Elected Member of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE), Board Member of Hungarian Academy of Engineering.






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 Laura M. Roa
 

Laura M. Roa is full professor of Control Systems Engineering and Automation at the University of Seville in Spain. She was born in C芍diz, Spain, and received the Ph.D degree (cum laude) from the University of Seville, Spain, in 1980. In 1988, she founded the Biomedical Engineering Research Group at the University of Seville, which she is in charge of. In 2006, this group was recognized as a founding group of the Spanish Network Center of Biomedical Research in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN).

She has been author of more than 340 papers, including journal papers, peer reviewed conference papers, book chapters, and books. She has directed different Ph.D Thesis and projects funded by various public Spanish organizations and private companies. The research topics link different disciplines, including physiology, mathematical modeling, systems engineering and integration of information technologies. Her research activities have covered development of computational models for complex physiological systems, the design of intelligent algorithms for clinical applications, dosing the therapies for burn and renal patients using optimal control techniques, and information technologies and communications applied to telemedicine, homecare technologies and acessibility for elderly and disabled people. Her current research lines are focused on multiscale computational modeling for the detection of biological and pathological events, Smart devices for assisted living environments, Integration Architectures for health and social services, and Development of electromagnetism methods and techniques applied to solve bionanotechnologies problems.

She has served the Spanish Society of Biomedical Engineering (SEIB) in different positions of its Administrative Committee: Vice President (1987-89), Secretary General (1989-2004), President (2005-). She has also served in the Administrative Committee of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) as Representative of Region 8 during the term 2002-2006, advisory board member of the International Council on Medical & Care Compunetics (ICMCC) (2004-), member of the IFMBE Workgroup on Global Citizen Safety and Security, member of the Interim Council of the European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering Sciences (EAMBES) (1998-2002), member of the IEEE-EMBS Fellow Committee (2008-2009), and member of the IEEE Fellow Committee (2010-2012).

She is member of the Editorial Board of the IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, and of the International Journal of System Dynamics Applications.

Dr. Roa is a Fellow of the IEEE, Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), Fellow of the Intenational Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering Sciences (IAMBES), Fellow of EAMBES and a member of the Royal Medical Academy of Seville, Spain.


[top]                        

     
 Peter Rolfe
 

Professor Peter Rolfe*s Biomedical Engineering career spans more than 40 years. Following his undergraduate education in Electrical Engineering and a period working in industry on avionics and aircraft guidance systems, he retrained in physiology and biophysics, obtaining his PhD at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School 每 now Imperial College - at London University. His early research interests were on the development of measurement systems to study physiological control processes especially in the human fetus and ill newborn baby, continuing this work at the University of Oxford. He established the international conference on Fetal and Neonatal Physiological Measurement, also producing books on this topic.

In parallel with his work on advanced measurement technologies he became a consultant to the World Health Organisation. He established collaborative research and training programmes in developing countries with a focus on the role of appropriate technology for Maternal and Child Health. Studies on the development of simple technologies for thermal control of the newborn and for biochemical analysis involved hospitals and governmental agencies in India, Nepal, Thailand, Inner Mongolia, China and several African countries. The training of technical staff in equipment management was critical to success. He became Director of a WHO Collaborating Centre.

He continues work on electro-chemical and optical micro- and nanosensors for invasive measurement of blood gases, ions and metabolites, and on point-of-care sensors for health screening. Problems of biocompatibility of implanted sensors have involved the study of biomimetic materials to control protein adsorption at sensor surfaces. He has had a major interest in non-invasive measurement, especially based on optics. He led the first European multi-disciplinary projects investigating near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) for in vivo monitoring in the fetus, the newborn and adult, especially for the brain and muscle. His group developed NIRS instruments that were manufactured by the Radiometer Company, and they also extended this work into NIRS tomography and non-invasive biochemical measurement using multivariate analysis. His measurements interests have also extended into environmental monitoring, especially for investigating indoor air quality.

His work took him closer again to the biophysics of cells and, in 1989, he became co-Chairman of a new IFMBE Working Group on Cellular Engineering, and he established an international programme in Cell and Tissue Engineering. He established the Centre (now Institute) for Science and Technology in Medicine at Keele University. He continues development of specialised bioreactors to re-create in vivo conditions for cell culture. Using his invasive and non-invasive sensing devices he investigates fundamental cellular processes, especially in stem cells, devising control systems to optimise cell, tissue and organ growth.

He has held established and visiting professorial positions in the UK, Italy, Japan, and China. Whilst Director of the Biomedical Engineering Centre at Oxford University he also set up several spin-out companies, and he maintains an interest in university-industry liaison and intellectual property management. He was Chairman of the UK*s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Medical Engineering Committee. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the IFMBE journal Medical & Biological Engineering and Computing (MBEC).


[top]                        

     
 Annelise Rosenfalck
 

Annelise Rosenfalck was born in Denmark in 1922 and received her MSc in electronic engineering from the Technical University of Denmark in 1947. Since then she has mainly worked at the Institute of Neurophysiology, University of Copenhagen. In February 1978 she was appointed professor of Medical Electronics at the Institute of Electronic Systems, Aalborg University Centre, Denmark, a new University with a goal of interdisciplinary collaboration. She has been president of the Danish Society for Biomedical Engineering, and a member of the COMAC BME of the Medical Research programs and the Commission of the European Communities. She has also evaluated projects for the BIOMED programs. Her publications fall within electrophysiology (signals from muscle nerve and brain) and biomedical methodology. One of her research awards was shared with her husband, Poul Rosenfalck.


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 Christian Roux
 

Christian Roux (IEEE Fellow, AIMBE Fellow, IAMBE Fellow) received the Agr谷gation degree in physics from the Ecole Normale Sup谷rieure, Cachan, France in 1978 and the Ph.D. from the Institut National Polytechnique, Grenoble, France, in 1980. He is with Institut T谷l谷com 每 T谷l谷com Bretagne since 1982 as an Associate Professor and since 1987 as a Professor. He has been a Lecturer with the Institute of Technology in Caracas, Venezuela (1981-1982), a Visiting Professor with the Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania (1992-1993), and a Distinguished International Research Fellow with the department of Electrical Engineering, University of Calgary, Canada (1996, 2003). He is the founding Director of the Laboratoire de Traitement de l*Information M谷dicale, INSERM U650 and now U1101.

His research interests concerns advanced medical information processing, and spatial, temporal and functional information modeling and analysis in medical images, with applications in various medical domains including orthopedics, gastroenterology ophthalmology, cardiology and nuclear medicine.

Prof. Roux has published around 160 peer-reviewed papers, holds nine patents and is the co-founder of three spin-off companies in computer-assisted surgery. He was an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING and Chairman of its Steering Committee (1993-2003), and is member of the Editorial board of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY and of the PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE. He is the founding co-chairman of the IEEE EMBS International Summer School held every other year on Berder Island, France, which is now recognized as a worldwide reference. Prof. ROUX played a seminal role in the creation of IEEE ISBI International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging in 2002. He received the IEEE EMBS Award in 2003 and the Inserm Award for basic research in 2006.

He served as President of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society in 2001 and was member of the IFMBE ad-hoc committee in charge of establishing a European umbrella organization for the European MBE community that gave birth to EAMBES in which he participated in the various committees and board in 2003-2006 as representative of EMBS Europe.

In 2004 he became senior advisor with the French Ministry of Research and Program officer (2006-2009) with the French National Research Agency in the area of Technologies for Health. Since 2009, Prof. ROUX is Dean for Research with Telecom Bretagne.


[top]                        

     
 Masao Saito
 

Masao Saito (1933- ) graduated 1956 from Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. Tokyo, and received Doctor of Engineering, Univ. Tokyo 1962. Served as Professor of Engineering, as well as Professor of Medical Sciences 1974-2004 and received Prof. Emer. in Univ. Tokyo, Tokyo Denki Univ., and other universities. He joined in research of biological engineering in Univ. Pennsylvania, U.S.A, 1959-1960 as Fulbright Exchange Program.

He was a member of Prof. T. Sakamoto*s Group pioneering medical electronics from 1955, as well as Prof. H.P. Schwan*s Group of biological effect of electromagnetic fields from 1959. He also worked with H.J. Catlin from 1965 in studies of circuit and systems theory in Polytech. Inst. Brooklyn. He was one of invited lecturers in ICME (presently IFMBE) in 1961 and since published many papers in MBE and received number of honors in academic fields.

He was a member of meeting in 4th ICME 1961 founding the framework of present IFMBE and was one of the key members in establishing Japanese Soc. Med. Elect. Biol. Eng. In 1962. He was also a key member of ICMBE 1965 in Tokyo, which is known as a milestone in development of medical engineering. He served as a member of council and committees 1973-1985 in IFMBE, especially as President 1979-1982 in IFMBE. Since this period, he was concerned in harmonizing diversified activities of medical engineering in the world, and actively invited many new countries to join in IFMBE, He was elected as honorary life member of IFMBE 1985 as well as a member of IAMBE 1997, and received MBE Award of IUPESM 2000.

As social activities, in addition to MBE, he guided many policy-making national committees in Japan for engineering for infants and senior persons, in various aspects of care, positive life, assistive devices, manpower problems and industries. He is also interested in interaction of high technologies with human thought and published books, which is expected to guide many misdirected research efforts to the right way.


[top]                        

     
 Niilo Saranummi
 

Niilo Saranummi is research professor at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. He received his Dr.Tech. degree in biomedical engineering at Tampere University of Technology in 1976. He started at VTT in 1975 advancing through different positions and in 1982 he was appointed director of VTT*s Medical Engineering Laboratory with a staff of 70 full time employees. Since VTT's reorganization in 1994, he has worked in VTT as a research professor. In 2007-8 he worked at the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (www.tekes.fi) on a special assignment where the aim was to create a Strategic Centre for Science, Technology and Innovation in the area of health and well-being (www.salwe.fi). He has worked abroad on various occasions (MRC, Northwick Park Hospital 1978, Eindhoven University of Technology 1980, UN / Economic Commission of Europe 1985). His research interests include ICT applications for personalized health and disease management, interoperability and innovation, technology policy setting and technology transfer. He has published over 150 papers and chapters in peer-reviewed international publications.

He has served as an expert in the planning and running of Finnish and Nordic technology programs in the area of health technology. He has participated as co-coordinator and partner in more than 30 projects in the Framework Programs of R&D funded by the European Union in the areas of biomedical engineering and ICT for health. He was active in the standardization of medical devices in the late 70*s through early 80*s (IEC TC 62) and in health informatics (CEN TC 251) in the early 90*s. He is co-founder and chair of HL7 Finland 1996-2010, a society affiliated to Health Level Seven (www.hl7.fi).

In 1991-94 he served as President of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering, IFMBE (www.ifmbe.org) and in 1994-97 as President of the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine (IUPESM). In 1999 he was appointed by IFMBE to lead an ad-hoc committee with the charge to look into the possibilities of establishing a European umbrella organization that could cater for the needs of the European MBE community. In 2003, in the inauguration meeting of the European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering and Science (EAMBES, www.eambes.org) he was elected interim President (2003-4). In 2009-2012 he was the Chair of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.

He was Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions of Information Technology in Biomedicine, T-ITB (2002-7). He chaired IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society*s Technical Committee on Information Technology for Health (2007-10). He is an Area Editor for IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering (2008-present).

He is Fellow of Finnish Academies of Technology (www.facte.com), International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (www.ifmbe.org) and American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (www.aimbe.org) and IEEE (www.ieee.org). He was the recipient of IFMBE*s Otto Schmitt award in 2006.


[top]                        

     
 Shunsuke Sato
 

Shunsuke Sato received the B.S, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1963, 1965, and 1968, respectively. From1968 to 1970, he was with Tokyo Medical and Dental University. In 1970, he moved to Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, and he finished his career there as a Professor at the Department of Mechanical Science and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, on 31st March 2004. He is a Professor Emeritus of Osaka University. During 1983, he was a Visiting Professor at the University of Naples, Naples, Italy and the University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy. He was the president of Japanese Society for Medical and Biological Engineering for two years from May 2000. Since April 2004, he is with Aino University, a private university for health sciences, in Osaka, where he teaches undergraduate students mathematics and bioengineering. He has worked in the areas including biological signal processing, image reconstruction of a moving object in the X-ray CT, application of Wiener*s theory of nonlinear noise to system identification, the first-passage-time problems of diffusion processes and time-frequency distribution. His research interests are in the mathematical models and analyses of biological systems such as neuronal firing and biological rhythm and fluctuation.


[top]                        

     
 Klaus Schindhelm
 

Klaus Schindhelm is the Senior Vice President of Global Applied Research at ResMed Ltd in Australia and a professor of biomedical engineering at the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. He received his PhD in chemical engineering at the University of New South Wales in 1978. He was awarded an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship in 1978 which was taken in the Department of Experimental Nephrology at the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover. In 1980, he took up an academic position at the Centre for Biomedical Engineering, a postgraduate teaching and research centre at the University of New South Wales. He advanced through different positions within the Centre for Biomedical Engineering, becoming its Director in 1990 and Professor in 1992. In 1994, he was instrumental in establishing the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering (http://www.gsbme.unsw.edu.au) at the University of New South Wales and became its first head of school and foundation professor. In 1998 he took on the position of Vice President of Product Development and then, in 2000, Vice President of Operations at ResMed Ltd while maintaining his university appointment. His research interests have included: extracorporeal therapies involving solute, protein and cell manipulations; biomaterials development in orthopaedic, vascular and ocular environments; and, devices for ventilatory and sleep disordered breathing therapies.

He has been a member of both the Committee for Surgical Implants and the Biological Evaluation of Medical and Dental Devices and Materials for the Standards Association of Australia during the 80*s and 90*s. He chaired the National Committee on Biomedical Engineering (1991-2) and became the Founding Chairman for the College of Biomedical Engineering (1992-5) of the Institution of Engineers Australia. He was a board member (1998-2003) of the Cooperative Research Centre for Eye Research and Technology and a board member (2003-6) and then Chairman (2006- ) of the Vision Cooperative Research Centre (http://www.visioncrc.org/). He also served as a board member of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (2003-8). He chaired the review of the Division of Materials and Health Technologies for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia in 2009. He has been a member of the Therapeutic Goods Committee of the Therapeutic Goods Administration, Australia since 2002 and has chaired the Committee since 2011.

He received the Irene Marton Research Award in 1997 from the National Heart Foundation, Australia and in 2000, the David Dewhurst Award from the Institution of Engineers Australia. He is a Fellow in Biomaterials and Engineering of the International Union of Societies for Biomaterials Science and Engineering, a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia, and a Founding Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.


[top]                        

     
 Geert W. Schmid-Schonbein
 

Geert W. Schmid-Schonbein is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California San Diego. He received his Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering at UCSD. After three years as Post-doctoral Fellow in the Department of Physiology of Columbia University, New York, he joined the faculty of the Department of Bioengineering at UCSD in 1979. He teaches bioengineering and biomechanics of living tissues, biorheology and microcirculation, cell and molecular biomechanics with applications to inflammation, pathophysiology and diseases. He is Founding Member of AIMBE, was President of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1991 每 *92), the North American Society of Biorheology (1998 每 *99), and the Microcirculatory Society (2003 每 *04). He is Fellow of the American Heart Association, the Biomedical Engineering Society, the Cardiovascular Section of the American Physiological Society, and the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he is Member of the National Academy of Engineering. He was Secretary General of the 1st World Congress of Biomechanics (1990), co-founder of the US National Conference on Frontiers in Biomechanics (2003), Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Mechanisms in Lymphatic Function and Disease (*08), is Chair of the World Council for Biomechanics (2010 每 *14) and Chair of the US National Committee on Biomechanics (2011 to *13). He serves as consultant for the National Institute of Health, the National Science Foundation, science funding organizations in several countries around the World, and is science advisor to several corporations.

He has published over 360 original peer-reviewed research reports, several books and consensus reports. The team developed the first quantitative model of the microcirculation in skeletal muscle based on realistic microanatomy, rheological properties of blood, and a biomechanical model of blood vessels. They provided the first direct demonstration of inflammation in cardiac ischemia and identified a deleterious role of circulating leukocytes. They also provided the first direct evidence of inflammation in experimental models of stroke, in physiological shock with multi-organ failure, in diabetic retinopathy, in chronic venous disease, and in arterial hypertension, which have been confirmed in clinical studies. They discovered the mechanisms for capillary no-reflow phenomenon due to obstruction by circulating leukocytes, and they described the mechanotransduction mechanism on circulating leukocytes and its mechanosensors. His team discovered a second valve system in lymphatics as biomechanical basis for the lymph pump.

His team carries out engineering analysis of human disease with the objective to answer one of the most fundamental questions in inflammation research, i.e. the trigger mechanisms for inflammation that cause tissue injury and failure of organ function. They discovered in shock and multi-organ failure a mechanism for organ degradation due to digestive enzymes, designated as ※auto-digestion§. Recently the team proposed a fundamental hypothesis and provided evidence that type II diabetes, arterial hypertension, and other co-morbidities in the Metabolic Syndrome X are due to an unchecked proteolytic activity that causes cleavage of the extracellular domain of membrane receptors, such as insulin resistance due to cleavage of the insulin receptor ectodomain.

He is editorial board member for journals in Biomechanics, Cellular & Molecular Bioengineering, Biorheology, Physiology and Pathophysiology. He was the 2008 Landis Award winner of the Microcirculatory Society.


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 Leif Sornmo
 

Leif Sornmo is Professor at Lund University, Lund, Sweden. He received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Lund University in 1978 and 1984, respectively. From 1983 to 1995, he was a Research Fellow at the Department of Clinical Physiology, Lund University, where he was engaged in research on biomedical signal processing. Since 1990, he has been with the Signal Processing Group, Department of Electrical and Information Technology, Lund University, where he is currently a Professor of biomedical signal processing. His research interests include statistical signal processing, modeling of biomedical signals, methods for analysis of atrial fibrillation, multimodal signal processing in hemodialysis, and power-efficient signal processing in implantable devices.

He has published 120 articles in peer-reviewed journals and some 170+ conference papers. He has authored 17 book chapters and 4 books, including Bioelectrical Signal Processing in Cardiac and Neurological Applications (Elsevier, 2005) with Pablo Laguna as coauthor. His research involves close collaboration with Swedish companies active in biomedical engineering, and has to date resulted in 10 patents.

He is cofounder and responsible for the undergraduate/graduate biomedical engineering program at Lund University which started in 2011. He is Director and founding member of the Center of Integrative Electrocardiology at Lund University (CIEL). He was conference chairman of Computers in Cardiology in 1997, and the International Congress of Electrocardiology in 2010.

He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering and Journal of Electrocardiology, a member of the Editorial Board of Medical and Biological Engineering & Computing, and was an Associate Editor of Computers in Biomedical Research (1997-2000). He has been Guest Editor for several special issues in different journals. Since 2008, he is on the board of directors and secretary of Computing in Cardiology.

He is Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (www.aimbe.org), and Fellow of the Royal Physiographic Society, Sweden.


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 Jos AE Spaan
 

Jos Spaan is professor of Medical Physics at the Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam. He studied Engineering Physics at the Eindhoven University of Technology. After his Ph.D. in engineering he joined the Physiological Physics group at the Faculty of Medicine at the University in Leiden (1976) and was appointed part time professor in Physiological Physics (1982) at the Delft University of Technology. His interest always has been in the area of medical technology and the application of engineering principles to the analysis of the function of the vascular system in health and disease. His contributions to this field are especially directed to the supply of blood to the heart tissue, making the pump function of the heart possible. He was the first elected president of EAMBES, the European Alliance for Medical and Biological Engineering and Sciences.


[top]                        

     
 Fong-Chin Su
 

Fong-Chin Su is Distinguished Professor and Director of Medical Device Innovation Center 每 a Global Center of Excellence sponsored by Ministry of Education, National Cheng Kung University (NCKU), President of Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering and Secretary-Elect of World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers. Dr. Su was Associate Vice President for Research and Development (2010-2011) and Associate Dean of College of Engineering (2006-2010), NCKU. He is actively involved in biomechanics-related activities. Dr. Su is a founding councilor of Asian-Pacific Association for Biomechanics. In addition, he was the congress chair of several international conferences. He received his Ph.D. degree from Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, USA in 1989 with major in solid mechanics and biomechanics.

Dr. Su*s research focuses on biomechanics of human movement, hand biomechanics and upper extremity biomechanics. He joined the NCKU faculty of bioengineering in 1989. Meanwhile, he visited Orthopedic Biomechanics Laboratory in the Mayo Clinic, MN, USA as a visiting scientist 1993-94, a visiting professor at the Muscle Physiology Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, the University of California in the summer of 1999, and a visiting professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, 2004-05. He has published 200+ peer-reviewed journal papers and 7 book chapters and edited several conference proceedings and a book.

In addition, he is Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, associate editor of Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology, an editorial board member for Clinical Biomechanics, Archive of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Biomedical Engineering Online, Journal of Applied Bionics and Biomechanics, and Open Biomedical Engineering Journal, and serves as scientific reviewer for several international biomechanics journals.

With regard to professional activities, he is Past-President of Taiwanese Society of Biomechanics, an Executive Councilor of the Taiwan Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society and the Taiwan Industrial Technology Association and Secretary Elect of World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers. He was also a scientific peer review coordinator for Biomedical Engineering grant application, National Science Council, Taiwan.

Dr. Su has received several honors and awards including National Science Council Outstanding Research Award (2011), National Innovation Award (2010), Distinguished Professor Award (2005, 2010, 2013), You-Li Chou Medal, Taiwanese Society of Biomechanics (2007), Outstanding Engineering Faculty Research Award (2003), and Li Foundation Fellowship, etc. (1993-1994).


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 Kazuo Tanishita
 

Kazuo Tanishita was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1946. He received his BS in Mechanical Engineering in 1969 from Keio University, his MS in Production Mechanical Engineering in 1971 from Tokyo Institute of Technology and his PhD in Engineering in1975 from Brown University. He also received his Dr. Eng. In 1986 from Tokyo Institute of Technology. From 1976 to 1981 he was a research associate in Tokyo Women*s Medical College and was an assistant professor in Keio University from 1981 to 1984. From 1984 to 1992 he was an associate professor in Keio University and was a professor from 1992 to 2012 in Keio University. He is currently a professor emeritus of Keio University and a professor of Waseda University, in the Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. He is also a visiting professor of school of medicine in Tokai University and a visiting researcher of National Institute of Science and Technology Policy.

His research has focused on the Biofluid mechanics of respiratory and circulatory system and cellular mechanics applied to tissue engineering. He has been studying the arterial flow in the cerebral aneurysm and proposed the hemodynamic hypothesis for the development and rupture of cerebral aneurysm. To verify this hypothesis, he performed animal experiments of induced cerebral aneurysm and found out the interesting correlation between the hemodynamics and expression of enzymes associating with the vessel wall destruction. He also has been devoting the study of vessel network formation by effective use of mechanical stimulus, which is one of the important subjects in tissue engineering. He found out the interesting process of vessel network formation with the application of shear stress stimulus and concentration gradient of growth factor. He concluded that the development of tissue engineering needs mechanical factors to achieve the reconstructed tissue.

He has been contributing to both education and development of biomechanical engineering through lectures and his work with students, and by serving as the vice president of Japan Society for Mechanical Engineers (JSME) and congress committee member of IUTAM. He was also a president of Japanese Society of Biorheology and an editor in chief of Journal of Biorheology. He is or was a trustee of several professional societies, including Japan Society of Computer Aided Surgery, Japan Federation of Engineering Societies.

He received the awards due to significant contribution to the field of biomechanical engineering. Bioengineering Achievement Award of Bioengineering Division of JSME in 1995, JSME MEDAL for the best papers in 1996, MAGNA CUMLAUDE CITATION of American Society of Nueroradiology in 2001, Fellow of JSME in 2001, Prize for Credit of Bioengineering Division of JSME in 2007, Keio University Award in 2011, Fellow of Japan Federation of Engineering Societies in 2012, Honorary member of JSME in 2012.


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 Nitish Thakor
 

Dr. Thakor is one of the distinguished pioneers of the field of neuroengineering. He is recognized for his leadership in naming and shaping the discipline as well as contributing significantly to its understanding and maturation. He has written many peer reviewed papers and served as the keynote speaker at many conferences. In parallel, he has authored or co-authored nearly 200 archival publications and, served as Editor in Chief of IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering. Dr. Thakor*s outstanding accomplishments in the field of neuroengineering are numerous. He has excelled in three major areas in particular: analyzing and monitoring brain injury using advanced signal processing methods; developing vital technology for neural interfaces; leading the development of neural prosthetics capable of dexterous manipulation. These directions are naturally complementary.

Dr. Thakor*s work in analyzing and monitoring brain injury resulting from cardiac arrest using advancing signal processing techniques showed that EEG, EP and neural spike activities were altered as a result of brain injury. This has led to better procedures and measures that can be used to predict and forecast outcomes after such injuries. He built on the success of these studies to embark on the next frontier: the neural interface. He and his students and colleagues developed the next generation circuitry to detect electrical and neurochemical signals from the brain. They have extended the use of these very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits to wireless data and telemetry. In addition, they developed novel applications of functional optical brain imaging. The significance of this research has been widely acknowledged and Dr. Thakor*s expertise and leadership in this area are unparalleled.

The third frontier that Dr. Thakor is spearheading is neural prosthetics. He is leading the development of a neural interface technology that uses signal processing and decoding to interpret brain signals in neural prosthetics capable of dexterous manipulation. This research is an integral part of DARPA*s ※Revolutionary Prosthesis§ programs and offers tremendous potential. The goal of Dr. Thakor*s research centers on basic research as well as technology development and clinical applications. He has demonstrated that the emerging field of Neuroengineering is poised to address the growing need for life saving and life enhancing solutions for neurological disorders and injuries.


[top]                        

     
 Jie Tian
 

Jie Tian, IEEE Fellow (from 2010), IAMBE Fellow (from 2012), received the PhD degree (with honor) in artificial intelligence from the Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1993. Since 1997, he has been a professor in the Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is a winner of the China National Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (2002). He has been a distinguished professor of the Cheung Kong Scholars program since 2006. He has been the chief scientist of the National Basic Research Program (973) twice (2006, 2011). He is the director of the Pattern Recognition and Machine Intelligence committees in Chinese Society of Automation. He is the director of the Chinese Society for Molecular Imaging. He is a part-time professor and part-time doctoral advisor of the The Fourth Military Medical University, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing Normal University, Northeastern University and Beijing University of Technology. He is also a distinguished professor of Xidian University and the director of the school of life science and biotechnology.

His research interests are medical image process and analysis, pattern recognition, biometics, etc. He has published more than 200 papers in peer-reviewed journals including IEEE transactions and served as technical reviewer for several IEEE publications, such as IEEE TMI, TPAMI, TIP, TITB, and TBE. Dr. Tian has also served on the Program Committee of several EMBS-sponsored meetings: EMBC on NER 2011 (Associate Editor), VINCI 2010~2011, OHBM 2011, ICME 2011, 2011 ISPHT 2011, SSCI 2011, ACM SAC 2011, IASTED International Conference on BioMed 2008~2011, ICNSC 2010, CSCWD 2010, ICB 2009, IWCIA 2009, IASTED International Conference on SIP 2008, CBMS 2007. He is the founding chair of the EMBS chapter in Beijing, and a member of the EMBS Technical Committee on Biomedical Imaging and Image Processing. Due to the research and development of the 3D medical imaging processing and analyzing system (3DMed), he won the National Award for Progress in Science and Technology in 2003, and also won the National Award for Progress in Science and Technology in 2004 for the system and application of fingerprint recognition, and he also is a winner of 2010 National Award for Technological Invention for imaging method and system for small animal multimodality optical molecular imaging. Dr. Tian was also recognized as one of the top ten science leaders of China in 2003.

Dr. Tian is a reviewer of Mathematical Reviews, American mathematical society. He is the Committee member of Journal of X-ray Science and Technology, International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, Frontiers of Computer Science in China, Journal of Software (in Chinese), Progress in Natural Science (both in English and Chinese), Science in China Series F: Information Sciences, Journal of Computers (in Chinese) and Journal of Software (in Chinese). He is the associate editor of the Acta Automatica Sinica (2010) and the Chinese journal of nuclear medicine and molocular imaging (2011).


[top]                        

     
 Tatsuo Togawa
 

Tatsuo Togawa was born in Tokyo in 1937, graduated from Waseda University, Department of Applied Physics in 1960, and received Ph.D. in applied physics from University of Tokyo in 1965. He had been a professor of Department of Biomedical Instrumentation, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University from 1972 to 2003 including a period of 1978-1979 being a Visiting Research Fellow, USC School of Medicine. In these periods of over 30 years, he had been involved in studies of biomedical sensors and instrumentations, physiological measurements, physiological models, artificial organs, and health care systems. He wrote more than 100 original papers and wrote monographs and handbooks including Togawa T, Tamura T, Togawa T, Biomedical Transducers and Instruments, CRC Press, 1997. Then he served as a professor in Waseda University, School of Human Sciences until 2008. During this period, he attempted to view human nature from bioengineering and evolutionary standpoint, and wrote three monographs in this topic. Then, he has been a guest research fellow, Advanced Research Center for Human Sciences, Waseda University. Togawa T, Tamura T, Togawa T, Biomedical Sensors and Instruments Second edition, CRC Press was published in 2011. He has been a fellow of the Institute of Physics, UK, a senior member of IEEE EMBS, and a member of Japanese Society for Medical and biological Engineering, Japan Society of Clinical Monitoring, Medical Instrument Society of Japan, Society of Life Support Technology, Society of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Japanese Heart Rhythm Society, and Society for Science on Form Japan. He served as associate editor of IEEE Transaction of Biomedical Engineering, and Medical Engineering and Physics, and editorial board member of Physiological Measurement. He received Doctor Honoris Causa from Linkoping University, Sweden, and Medal IBIB PAN from Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Plosh Academy of Sciences, and has been a Foreign Member of Polish Academy of Sciences.


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 Shoogo Ueno
 

Shoogo Ueno is professor emeritus, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, professor at Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, and is also dean of the Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Fukuoka, Omuta, Japan.

He received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. (Dr. Eng.) degrees in electronic engineering from Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, in 1966, 1968, and 1972, respectively. Dr. Ueno was an associate professor with the Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, from 1976 to 1986. From 1979 to 1981, he spent his sabbatical with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden, as a guest scientist. He subsequently served as a professor in the Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University from 1986 to 1994, and a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo from 1994 to 2006. In 2006 he retired from the University of Tokyo as professor emeritus. Since 2006 he has been a professor with the Department of Applied Quantum Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, and is also dean of the Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Fukuoka, Omuta, Japan.

He has been devoting himself for studies on biomedical engineering, biomagnetics, bioelectromagnetics, and bioimaging for more than 40 years, in particular, on magnetic nerve stimulation and localized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with figure-eight coils, the electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoenchephalographic (MEG) mapping and modeling, imaging of electrical impedance and current in the living body, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), called impedance MRI and current MRI, magnetic control of biological cell orientation and cell growth by strong magnetic fields, and cancer therapy and other medical treatments using strong pulsed magnetic fields. He is also interested in studies on effects of radio frequency magnetic fields and control of iron ion release and uptake from and into ferritins, iron cage proteins.

Dr. Ueno is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) (2001) and of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) (2001). He is a Fellow and Member-at-Large of the Governing Council of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE) (2006). He was an elected member of the IEEE Magnetics Society Administrative Committee (2004-2009). He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE (2011). He was President of the Bioelectromagnetics Society (2003-2004), Chairman of the International Union of Radio Science*s Commission K on Electromagnetics in Biology and Medicine (2000-2003), President of the Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society (1999-2001), President of the Magnetics Society of Japan (2001-2003), and President of the Japanese Society for Medical and Biological Engineering (2002-2004). He is a member of the International Advisory Board of International Conferences on Biomagnetism since 1987. He received the Doctor Honoris Causa from Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden (1998). He was a 150th Anniversary Jubilee Visiting Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden (2006), and a visiting professor at Simon Frasier University, Burnaby, Canada (1994) and Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia (2008). He was awarded the d*Arsonval Award, the highest award of the Bioelectromagnetics Society in 2010. Dr. Ueno gave 47 seminars on biomagnetics in the world as a mission of the IEEE Magnetics Society Distinguished Lecturer during 2010.


[top]                        

     
 Max E. Valentinuzzi
 

Bachelor from Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires, graduated as Telecommunications Engineer at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. PhD in Physiology and Biophysics from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, where he also became Assistant Professor. Professor of Bioengineering and Head of Laboratory at Universidad Nacional de Tucum芍n and Career Investigator of Consejo Nacional Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Argentina. In 1973, he shared the Nightingale Prize of Bioengineering by IFMBE and in 1980 the Houssay Prize of Biology (Sociedad Argentina Biolog赤a). EMBS Career Achievement Award, IEEE Life Fellow Member and recipient of other recognitions. Emeritus Member of the American Physiological Society and member of several societies and academies.

In approximately 50 years, this investigator has published 99 papers in indexed journals, 34 in non-indexed journals and presented 96 communications to congresses, all classified as R&D. Besides, he produced 22 articles, 4 books and 7 chapters that can be considered as teaching and/or review products; he was also guest editor of 6 special issues of recognized journals. There were 27 general articles and 16 communications and/or conferences, the latter by invitation. He has 5 translations and 37 miscelaneous papers. He supervised 27 final projects for undergraduate students, was consultant to a master degree thesis in the USA, and directed or codirected 10 doctoral dissertations. Dr. Valentinuzzi has contributed to the development of BME in Latin America and Argentina. The IEEE/EMBS gave him the 1996 Career Achievement Award (Amsterdam) and the IEEE promoted him to the maximum level of Fellow in 1999. He was the main speaker of the EMBS Canc迆n Conference in 2003 and recipient of the Bernardo Houssay Prize of Argentina in 2004. See http://www.herrera.unt.edu.ar/bioingenieria/Noticias_novedades/Reportajes/texto%20completo.htm.


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 Christopher L. &Kit* Vaughan
 

Christopher L. &Kit* Vaughan is Emeritus Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town in South Africa. Vaughan is considered a world authority on the biomechanics of human locomotion for which he was recognised with the award of a Doctor of Science in Medicine degree in 2009. He served as President of the International Society of Biomechanics from 1999 to 2001.

Vaughan was the founding director in 2000 of the Medical Imaging Research Unit at the University of Cape Town (www.miru.uct.ac.za). He is the author of the award-winning book, Imagining the Elephant (http://www.icpress.co.uk/popsci/p539.html), a biography of Allan MacLeod Cormack who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1979 for his contributions to the development of computer assisted tomography.

In 2006 Vaughan was elected a Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field, and in 2009 he was awarded an A rating by the National Research Foundation of South Africa as a leading international scholar (www.nrf.ac.za). In 2010 he took early retirement from the University of Cape Town and currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of CapeRay Medical (www.caperay.com), a spin out company that is developing innovative systems to detect breast cancer.

Born April 21, 1953 to Peter Leslie Vaughan, a mining engineer, and Margaret Baillie Vaughan at Blyvooruitzicht in the Western Transvaal, South Africa, Kit Vaughan was educated at Michaelhouse, and then attended Rhodes University where he graduated with honours in 1975, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in applied mathematics and physics with distinction. He represented the university in track and field athletics, golf and weight lifting.

While a student at the University of Iowa, where he received a PhD in musculoskeletal biomechanics in 1980, Vaughan captained the university*s rugby team. In 1983 he was a post-doctoral fellow in orthopaedic engineering at Oxford University when he first began to establish himself as a scholar in the field of human locomotion.

Vaughan spent the years 1986 to 1989 as an Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Clemson University, where he published Dynamics of Human Gait that, with the software package Gait Laboratory, was recognised as an important contribution to the field. Between 1989 and 1995 he was Professor of Orthopaedics and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia where he directed the motion analysis laboratory and published significant findings on the treatment of children with cerebral palsy. In 1996 Vaughan returned to South Africa to accept appointment as the Hyman Goldberg Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Cape Town, a position he held until his retirement in 2009.

Within the broad spectrum of human locomotion, Vaughan*s seminal contributions have been in three separate but related areas: basic theories of human gait; impact of clinical interventions on the neuromuscular system; and engineering tools for human movement scientists.


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Karin Wardell

Karin Wardell is professor of biomedical engineering. She has an outstanding academic career, especially in the field of biomedical optics. She has the proven ability to open new scientific fields. She started new companies and demonstrated a fruitful collaboration with others. With her energy and ambition she has created an internationally oriented research group.

She received an MSc in electrical engineering and applied physics in 1987 from Linkoping Institute of Technology and a PhD in Biomedical Instrumentation in 1994. Since 2002 she is a full professor at the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and head of the group minimally invasive instrumentation. Her international experiences involve research visits at Yale Medical School, USA; University of New South Wales, Australia; Rheinisch-Westfalische Technische Hochschule, Germany and participation in the EC-project HIRELADO. She has more than ten years of experience in working with biomedical industry partners, mainly through the Swedish Competence Centre NIMED. She was one of the co-founders of Lisca AB a company marketing laser Doppler perfusion imagers. At Linkoping University she actively participates in both the graduate and undergraduate education. Current research-focus is set on projects within "Neuro-engineering for navigation, intervention and implementation in neurosurgery".

Her research group focuses on biomedical engineering systems for minimally invasive diagnostics and therapy. The projects are driven by clinical needs in close collaboration with industry and clinical researchers.


[top]                        

     
 Bruce C. Wheeler
 

Bruce C. Wheeler received a dual S.B. degree in Physical Science and History from MIT in 1971, and the M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 1977 and 1981 respectively. In 1980 he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, working his way from Visiting Assistant Professor to Professor. He also held faculty positions in the Bioengineering Program and later Department, the Neuroscience Program, the Beckman Institute, and the Microelectronics Center. In 2008 he moved to become a faculty member in the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Florida.

While at Illinois he wrote the successful proposal for the B.S., M.S., Ph.D. and Department of Bioengineering and served as Director and then Founding and Interim Head from 2002 to 2008. He also served one year as Interim Chair of the Bioengineering Program, three years as Chair of the Neuroscience Program, and six years as the Associate Head for Undergraduate Affairs of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department.

After moving to Florida he was appointed and served four years as Acting Chair of the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering. He co-authored the successful proposal to establish the B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, making him likely the only person to start two undergraduate bioengineering degree programs.

Dr. Wheeler served as Editor in Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, likely the largest and certainly one of the most influential general biomedical engineering journals. During his six-year term submissions tripled and response time declined by two-thirds, accompanied by substantial improvements in paper quality. He then served a two-year term (2013/14) as President of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, the world*s largest, oldest, and most global bioengineering society, making multiple contributions in role of the society in IEEE in the areas of life sciences and health informatics and in the running of the society.

Prof. Wheeler*s research interests lie in the application of electrical engineering methodologies to neuroscience. His work influenced the development of neural spike sorting technologies and demonstrated that microelectrode array recording from brain slices was possible and productive. He has lead the field in the development of lithography to control cells, especially neurons, in culture, leading to demonstrations of the effects of structure (geometric form) on neural function (electrical activity). This work aims at basic science understanding of the behavior of small populations of neurons, in hopes of creating better insight into the functioning of the brain. His record includes over 60 peer-reviewed papers, 20 editorials, 8 patents, 190 conference papers, and 170 invited lectures.

He is a Fellow of the IEEE, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He has served on advisory boards for seven BME departments. He taught in a public high school (Niskayuna NY) and a private elementary school (Blacksburg VA). He has won teaching and advising awards at Illinois and multiple athletic awards in high school and college, including an NCAA Fellowship.


[top]                        

     
 Peter Wells
 

Peter Wells trained in electrical engineering (BSc, Aston University), physics (MSc, Bristol University) and zoology (PhD, Bristol University). He was awarded the DSc by Bristol University in 1978, the honorary DTech by Lund University in 1997, the honorary MD by Erasmus University in 1998 and the honorary DSc by Aston University in 2010.

Appointments: Research Assistant, United Bristol Hospitals, 1960-1971; Professor of Medical Physics, Welsh National School of Medicine (now Cardiff University School of Medicine), 1972-1974; Chief Physicist, United Bristol Healthcare NHS Trust (and its predecessors) 1975-2000; Honorary Professor in Clinical Radiology, Bristol University, 1986-2000; Associate Medical Director for Research and Development, United Bristol Healthcare NHS Trust, 1996-1999; Professor of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, Bristol University, 2000-2001, now Emeritus; Non-executive Director, Weston Area Health NHS Trust, 2001-2004; Consultant, Central Laboratory of the Research Councils, 2001-2005; Visiting Professor, Imperial College London, 2002-present; Distinguished Research Professor, Institute of Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, 2004-present; Visiting Professor, University College London, 2011-present.

Peter Wells has served as President of the British Medical Ultrasound Group (now the British Medical Ultrasound Society), the British Institute of Radiology (the oldest radiological society in the world) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

His research has been mainly in the field of medical ultrasonics. He is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of 18 books, 179 journal papers and 149 other publications. From 1992 to 2006, he was editor-in-chief of ※Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology§, the official journal of the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), the Royal Academy of Engineering (FREng) and the Academy of Medical Sciences (FMedSci), and a Founding Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales (FLSW) and the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is also: Honorary Fellow, British Institute of Radiology, Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, Royal College of Radiologists, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound; Honorary Life Member, World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology; Honorary Member, British Medical Ultrasound Society, Australasian Society for Ultrasound in Medicine, Korean Society of Ultrasound in Medicine; and Fellow, Royal Society of Medicine.

In 2008, he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to healthcare science.


[top]                        

     
 Andrzej Werynski
 

Professor Andrzej Werynski (1937每2011), corresponding Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, was a prominent Polish scientist in biomedical engineering, pioneer in the field of artificial organs. He was the co-originator of this field of knowledge in Poland.

He received the M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Warsaw Technical University in 1960. Since 1963 he has worked for the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS) in automatic control and medical engineering. In 1969 he received the Ph.D. degree in engineering science from the Institute of Automatic Control PAS. Since 1975 he has been with the Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS in Warsaw where he served initially as Director of Research (1978每1992), and for the next 15 years as the Director of the Institute (1993每2007). In 207-2011 he served as Chairman of the Committee of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS. He worked abroad as a visiting scientist at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands in 1972 and in the Department of Artificial Organs at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, USA in 1980每1981 and 1987每1988. In 2007, he was awarded the title of Foreign Professor at Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

His main research interests concerned artificial and hybrid organs used for supporting metabolism. He was an outstanding expert in the field of the mathematical modeling of physiological processes. His most important scientific achievements include the development of compartment modeling methods occurring during renal replacement therapy, particularly mathematical models used to describe hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. He was the author and coauthor of over 350 well-referenced publications including 130 peer-reviewed papers in indexed scientific journals and conference proceedings with ca. 1500 citations (H index 21).

He was Co-Editor for Eastern Europe in Artificial Organs, and member of the Editorial Committee of the Journal of Engineering in Medicine. He was very active in the international arena and a member of various societies. He was a board member of the European Society for Artificial Organs from 1994 to 1998, a Board Member and European Representative of the International Society for Artificial Organs from 1996 to 2003, and Professor-Member of the Senate at the International Faculty for Artificial Organs since 1996. In 2003 he was elected a Fellow of the International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Prof. Werynski was awarded by several distinctions for his scientific activities. Among them: the Order of Polonia Restituta Knight's Cross in 1989, and the Order of Polonia Restituta Officer's Cross in 2000. In 2007 he was conferred with of the honorary degree of Doctor Honoris Causa of Medicine in Karolinska Institute (Sweden).


[top]                        

     
 Nico Westerhof
 

Nico Westerhof studied experimental physics in Utrecht and received his MS degree in 1962. From 1964 to 1966 he worked in the Department of Physiology of Georgetown University in Washington D.C. In 1966 he started at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the Moore School of Electrical Engineering of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pa, where he received his Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering, in July 1968. In May 1969 he moved to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and joined the Department of Physiology of the Vrije Universiteit. He became Lecturer in 1971 and Professor in 1980.

From 1992 to 2002 he was Scientific Director of the Institute for CArdiovascular Research of the Vrije Universiteit (ICaR-VU). He became emeritus 31 May 2002. In 1996 he received an honorary doctorate from the Ecole Polytechnique F谷d谷rale de Lausanne, Switzerland. In 2009 he received the Dusser de Barenne medal of the Netherlands Society of Physiology for his life time contributions to physiology.

He was President of the Cardiovascular System Dynamics Society (1996-1998), is honorary member of the Italian Society for Experimental Biology, and member of the Turin Medical Academy of Sciences (Accademia di Medicina di Torino). His research interests are the cardiovascular system in general. He is particularly interested in the interaction between the arterial system and the heart in relation to hypertension, including modeling both systems. He also studies the coronary circulation. Since October 2006 he performs, part-time, research on pulmonary hypertension in the Department of Pulmonary Diseases of the VUmc, Amsterdam.


[top]                        

     
 Erich Wintermantel
 

Professor Erich Wintermantel, born in Baden-Wurttemberg, studied medicine at the University of Tubingen in Germany and was a visiting student with Prof. Yasargil, the founder of microneurosurgery at the University Hospital in Zurich from 1977 -1981. He earned an M.D. PhD. degree, having developed a new rapid microvascular surgical technique. He was a research fellow at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada (Prof. Charles Drake), the University of California Los Angeles (Prof. Bill House and House Ear Research Institute), the University of Montreal (Prof. Jules Hardy) and the University of Toulouse, France (Prof. Guy Lazorthes). Following clinical training in neurosurgery with Prof. Loew in Homburg/Saar, in abdominal and orthopedic surgery at university hospitals in Germany, he joined the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) in 1986 as senior assistant and scientific adjunct in mechanical engineering and lecturer in the design and manufacturing of medical implants and devices. He received his habilitation at ETH Zurich in 1991 in biomaterials science and engineering, and was an invited visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1991 and in 1992. At MIT he became a member of Langer Labs working with Professor Robert Langer, a pioneer and world leader in biomedical and process engineering, in developing degradable scaffolds for tissue engineering and drug release systems.

Erich Wintermantel became full Professor at ETH Zurich in 1992 as well as chairman of the Chair of Biocompatible Materials Science and Engineering and he served as Head of the ETH Institute of Construction and Design Engineering (120 collaborators, focusing on carbon fibre reinforced polymers / composites) from 1995 -2000. Having been invited to contribute to the High-Tech-Offensive Bayern with designing a Center of Medical and Biomaterials Engineering including a technology transfer company on campus he joined the Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) in 2000 for designing and building up the new Central Institute for Medical Engineering and he initiated together with 9 faculties and 60 professors and lecturers the new Masters Curriculum in Medical Engineering at TUM, the first one of its kind on university level in Germany. Erich Wintermantel holds the Chair of Medical Engineering at TUM, has been Founder in 2000 and CEO of the Central Institute for Medical Engineering from 2000 until 2005 and member of its Board of Directors from 2005 on. He initiated the first two Junior Professorships at TUM and integrated them into Medical Engineering (Prof. Hugel, biophysics and Prof. Forster-Henlein, mathematics). He has been Founder in 2003 and served as CEO of ITEM GmbH, a technology transfer company, from 2003 until 2007.

He is founding member and former president of the Swiss Society for Biomaterials and he lists more than 600 written and 700 oral publications, including 32 patents and trademarks. He has headed more than 1300 semester-, diploma-and master theses, 60 Ph.D. theses and maintains memberships with 26 national and international scientific societies, among them the German Societies for Thoracic, Heart and Vascular Surgery, for Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery, for Surgery and for Biomedical Engineering as well as Verein Deutscher Ingenieure VDI, the American Chemical Society ACS and the Society for Biomaterials (USA). Being a Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biomedical Engineering IAMBE he has been member of several governmental and industrial boards. He is author and editor of all editions of ※Medizintechnik 每Life Science Engineering§ a standard monography in Medical Engineering in German language (2500 pp.). His financial responsibility lists up to Euro 46 million, his personnel responsibility summarizes 700 collaborators. As a result of a nationwide competitive evaluation and for his professional advisorship he has been awarded KPMG/UNICUM Professor of the Years 2006, 2007 and 2008. Wintermantel initiated and maintains two annual technological conferences, on national and international levels, with modern polymer technologies for Life Sciences.

His main research interest is the biocompatibility of new materials, process engineering applied to materials, mainly polymers, structure and surface modification of polymer materials, new properties of fibre reinforced, multiphase and porous materials, namely for microinjection molded parts and materials for intraarterial stenting systems, cardiovascular systems and middle ear implants, for tissue engineering and tissue repair including carrier systems for postnatal stem cells. Recently manufacturing and production related research was added, mainly sterile production of thermoplastics. The main applied research focus is the clinically applicable implant, instrument, or device system being compatible with modern imaging techniques, i. e. NMR and CT scanning. For future work he concentrates on microinjection molding for microdevices and on the technology link between medical, pharma, food and cosmetics engineering as all of these Life Sciences address outer or inner surfaces of the human body and biocompatibility.


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 Jan Wojcicki
 

Jan Maria Wojcicki received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Electrical Faculty of the Warsaw Technical University in 1970 and 1978, respectively. In 1991 he completed his habilitation dissertation and became Associate Professor in Biomedical Engineering. Since 1999 he has been Professor in the technical sciences.

From 1994 till 2007 he was working as a Deputy Director of the IBBE PAS and since 2007 as a Director of the institute. Since 2009 he is Director of the International Center of Biocybernetics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. In 2005 Professor Wojcicki was elected to the Committee of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering PAS. In 2007 he was elected to be a corresponding member of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Since 1998 Professor Wojcicki has been appointed as a ※Visiting Professor§ (honorary title) at the Donau University, Krems, Austria.

Since 2005 he is Chairman of the Polish National Scientific Network on Biomedical Engineering "BIOMEN". From 2006 to 2009 he was a Chairman of the ROTMED Consortium dealing with the monitoring system and scenarios of development of the medical technologies in Poland till year 2020. In 2012 he was appointed as a member of the Commission of the Medical Devices of the Ministry of Health.

Since 2011 Professor Wojcicki is a co-editor for Eastern Europe of the Journal of Artificial Organs. He was a Section Editor (Artificial Pancreas, Diabetes and Endocrinology) and since 2010 member of the editorial board in the International Journal of Artificial Organs, member of the editorial board of the Journal of the Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences and since 2009 Editor-in Chief of this journal.

He was engaged for 8 years in activities of the European Society of Artificial Organs as a Board Member. In 2006 he was elected to the Executive Board of ESAO as a Treasurer and in 2012 as a President Elect of this society. He was member of the ProTem Group (2003 每 2005), a working group for the European Alliance in the field of biomedical engineering, then he was elected to be a member of the Interim Executive Board of the newly born European Society (2005-2006) 每 European Alliance for Medical Biological Engineering and Sciences (EAMBES) and in 2006 he was a member of the EAMBES Council. In 2012 he has been appointed as a member of the Fellows Division of this organization. Since 2006 he has been elected to the Administrative Council of IFMBE. In 2012 he was elected as a Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering. In 2009 he was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

He has published ~300 publications including monographs, chapters, papers and conference materials, as well as 14 Polish and international patents and 27 expert reports.

Dr. Wojcicki is an expert in the research field of artificial internal organs for metabolic support, in particular artificial pancreas and diabetes treatment. In his research work, he introduced new developments utilizing home telecare, membrane technologies, micro-measurement technologies and various monitoring techniques aimed at improvement of applied therapy, patient*s comfort, safety and self-confidence. Recently he, as a coauthor, received an Award "Innovation for Health 2009" in a category of the Innovative Medical Technologies for computerized system controlling treatment of the diabetic foot syndrome patients (TeleDiaFoS) in a contest organized by Polish Working Group for Innovations in Health Care.

In 2005 Professor Wojcicki received Gold Cross of Merit and in 2011- Knight's Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta.


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 Bernhard Wolf
 

Bernhard Wolf is Professor of Medical Electronics at the Heinz Nixdorf-Lehrstuhl f邦r Medizinische Elektronik at the Technische Universitat M邦nchen, Germany. His main area of research is the complete realization of biohybrid, microsensor-based lab-on-chip systems for systemic drug discovery, tumor diagnosis and treatment.

Bernhard Wolf was born in 1949 in Freiburg i. Br., Germany. He studied biology, physics and chemistry at the University of Freiburg. In 1973 he graduated as Biologist and obtained the state examination (German Staatsexamen) for the qualification of secondary school physics teacher in 1978.

Professor Wolf set up an electron microscopic analysis work group at the Institut f邦r Immunobiologie at the Universitat Freiburg in 1980 and conducted various tumor biologically orientated DFG projects. Between 1983 and 1987 he developed a low temperature cryo-preparation system for ice-free preparation of biological material in collaboration with LKB Bromma in Sweden.

After his habilitation for Biophysics by the Faculty of Medicine at the Universitat Freiburg, in 1988, he achieved his lecturer qualification and lectured in Freiburg and the Ecole sup谷rieure de Biotechnologie in Strasbourg, France.

In 1998 Bernhard Wolf was appointed full professor of biophysics at the Lehrstuhl f邦r Biophysik, Universitat Rostock, Germany. He got member of the Innovationskolleg Komplexe und Zellulare Sensorsysteme. Furthermore, he became scientific director of the Institut f邦r Zelltechnologie e.V, in cooperation with Professor D.G. Weiss, at the Universitat Rostock.

Since 2000 Bernhard Wolf holds the highly-respected Heinz-Nixdorf Lehrstuhl f邦r Medizinische Elektronik, endowed by the Heinz Nixdorf Foundation.

Bernhard Wolf has contributed to the education of students, especially engineers. He has been significantly contributing to excellent curricula in Biomedical Electronics and offers lectures, practical courses and seminars which are very well accepted and appreciated by the students from various disciplines.

Professor Bernhard Wolf is member of: Deutsche Gesellschaft f邦r Medizinische Physik, Deutsche Gesellschaft f邦r Biophysik, Deutsche Gesellschaft f邦r Zellbiologie, Deutsche Gesellschaft f邦r Biomedizinische Technik, Deutsche Gesellschaft f邦r Elektronenmikroskopie, EMAS, European Microanalytical Society, Verein der Elektrotechnik, Elektronik und Informationstechnik e.V., Bund der Freunde der Technischen Universitat M邦nchen, Bayern Innovativ, the Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften (acatech) and the International Academy for Medical and Biomedical Engineering.

From 2007 to 2010, he was Director of the Zentralinstitut f邦r Medizintechnik (IMETUM) at the Technische Universitat M邦nchen in Garching.


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 Guang-Zhong Yang
 

Professor Guang-Zhong Yang, PhD, FREng is Director and Co-founder of the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Deputy Chairman of the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, UK. Professor Yang also holds a number of key academic positions at Imperial 每 he is Director and Founder of the Royal Society/Wolfson Medical Image Computing Laboratory, co-founder of the Wolfson Surgical Technology Laboratory, Chairman of the Centre for Pervasive Sensing.

Professor Yang*s main research interests are in medical imaging, sensing and robotics. In imaging, he is credited for a number of novel MR phase contrast velocity imaging and computational modelling techniques that have transformed in vivo blood flow quantification and visualization. These include the development of locally focused imaging combined with real-time navigator echoes for resolving respiratory motion for high-resolution coronary-angiography, as well as MR dynamic flow pressure mapping for which he received the ISMRM I. I Rabi Award. He pioneered the concept of perceptual docking for robotic control, which represents a paradigm shift of learning and knowledge acquisition of motor and perceptual/cognitive behaviour for robotics, as well as the field of Body Sensor Network (BSN) for providing personalized wireless monitoring platforms that are pervasive, intelligent, and context-aware. Professor Yang is a Distinguished Lecturer for IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, fellow of IEEE, IET, AIMBE, City of Guilds and a recipient of the Royal Society Research Merit Award and The Times Eureka &Top 100* in British Science.


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 Zi Bin Yang
 

Dr. Zi Bin Yang received his medical degree from the Norman Bethune Medical University in1952. He had worked as a medical doctor (resident doctor and doctor in chief) in Peking Union hospital from 1953 to 1977. He also obtained his Bachelor*s degree in Radio-electronic at Beijing Tele-Communication College. In 1978, Zi Bin Yang was appointed the Vice Director of the Institute of the Basic Medical Sciences, the chairman of the Department of Biomedical Engineering in the Peking Union Medical College and the Institute of Basic Medical Science. From 1981-1982, he had took advanced study in the cardiovascular research laboratory at Texas Heart Institute. Texas, USA.

Dr. Zi Bin Yang re-joined School of Basic Medicine of Peking Union Medical College In 1983. He was appointed associate professor, professor and Chairman of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, PUMC, and the Director of the Artificial Organ Research Davison. His research focused on the biomaterials and artificial heart. He also engaged the teaching programs of biomaterials and the artificial organs in School of Basic Medicine Peking Union Medical College.

Dr. Yang has created the first implanted artificial heart in animal (Goat) which survival seven days in China. The paper has been published in the Journal of Chinese Medicine, 1981 Vol.61, No.4, And the Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases. Bulletin of the Texas Heart Institute vol.8 Number 3, September. 1981. He created the first Chinese catheter of IABP in china. Dr. Yang*s group first composed the material of Pole Ulithian for medical use in china and received award from government. His group also first composed the Chinese materials for the use of the intra venous solution bag and got the patented invention.

Dr. Yang has engaged in teaching programs of artificial organs and biomaterials in PUMC for more than 25 years. He published more than one hundred papers and three books. He have gotten 5patentsand obtained several scientific awards for his achievements of scientific research programs

Dr. Yang is an enthusiastic social activities scholar: He was elected the Vice President and Secretary General of Chinese Society of Biomedical Engineering in China from 1985 to 2005. He was elected to Memberships of National Secretary Committee of IFMBE in 1988. In 1990, he was elected the president of 2nd Asia-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering of IFMBE. In 1993 and 1997, he was elected to the members of Administrative Council of IFMBE. In 2002, Dr. Zi Bin Yang was elected a Fellow of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the BME field. In 2002, Dr. Yang was elected a member of Governing Council of IFMBE. In IFMBE NEWS No.71 MARCH-APRIL 2005 published BME PEOPLE Prof. Zi Bin Yang A Scientist Driving the Development of China&s Biomedical Engineering. He is the editor in chief of the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering.


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 Yuan-Ting Zhang
 

Dr. Yuan-Ting Zhang is the Director of Joint Research Center for Biomedical Engineering, Founding Head of the Division of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Department of Electronic Engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Dr. Zhang serves concurrently the Director of the Key Lab for Health Informatics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (HICAS).

His research spans several fields including wearable medical devices, body sensor networks, bio-THz technologies, bio-modeling, neural engineering, cardiovascular health informatics, and e-p-m-Heath and telemedicine technologies, and is closely tied up to his teaching and publishing activities. He has authored/co-authored over 400 scientific publications and 11 book chapters, and filed 31 patents. His research work has won him a number of Awards including the best journal paper awards from IEEE-EMBS and the Asia Pacific ICTA e-Health Award.

Dr. Zhang provided extensively professional services of significant value to the local industries and global academic communities. He served as Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, founding Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Guest Editor for IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, and Guest Editor for IEEE Communication Magazine. He was previously the Vice-President of the IEEE-EMBS. He served as the Technical Program Chair and the General Conference Chair of the 20th and 27th IEEE-EMBS Annual International Conferences in 1998 and 2005, respectively. He was a member of IEEE Fellow Elevation Committee and the Award Committee for IEEE Medal on Innovations in Healthcare Technology.

Dr. Zhang serves currently on IAMBE Fellow Membership Committee, IEEE-EMBS Standard Committee, HK-ITC Projects Assessment Panel, and Dr. Zhang also serves Editorial Board Member for the Book Series of Biomedical Engineering published by IEEE Press and Willey, Chair of working group for developing IEEE standard on wearable cuffless blood pressure measuring devices, and Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine (which will be renamed as IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics (J-BHI) starting from Jan. 2013).

Dr. Zhang holds the fellowships from the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the development of wearable medical devices and mobile health technologies.


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